From Fermilab: “Fermilab breaks ground on coil fabrication for Jefferson Lab collaboration”


Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

Friday, Jan. 17, 2014
Sarah Witman

There is perhaps no greater challenge, mentally, than taking on a project that has been attempted previously but not successfully completed.

This is the position a team of Fermilab engineers and physicists found themselves in more than a year ago, when Jefferson Lab, based in Virginia, came to Fermilab for help on a project: fabricating magnet coils for an upgrade to its CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) experiment.

It turned out to be a good move. In late November, a Magnet Systems Department fabrication team in the Technical Division successfully wound a full-size coil, called a practice coil, of the type to be installed in the new torus magnet for the upgrade of Jefferson Lab’s CLAS detector. Jefferson Lab’s upgraded facilities will provide scientists with unprecedented precision and reach for studies of atomic nuclei.

coil
The Magnet Systems Department recently successfully completed a prototype torus magnet coil for the Jefferson Lab CLAS12 upgrade. They devised a relatively inexpensive system, seen here, for winding the 2,500-pound coil. While the price of a standard coil-winding table that can hold a 4,000-pound fixture is $190,000, the Fermilab team built an adequate system for less than $10,000. One layer of coil, sitting at the winding fixture with a 12-foot-diameter cable spool installed above the fixture, and the second spool on the tensioner, is almost completely wound. Photo: Douglas Howard, TD

“Now we can say we can definitely do this job,” said Fermilab engineer Sasha Makarov. “It seems like Jefferson Lab is very satisfied with our achievement.”

See the full article here.

Fermilab Campus

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.


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