From Fermilab: “Tracking particles with LArIAT”

Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013
Laura Dattaro

“A neutrino is a tricky thing: It rarely interacts with other particles, and it doesn’t leave a track as it enters a detector. But a relatively new technology, called a liquid-argon time projection chamber, is helping scientists to understand them. MicroBooNE, the second phase of the Booster Neutrino Experiment, is one example of a LArTPC, and in order to help it do its job, scientists are first building a test detector called LArIAT—essentially a mini MicroBooNE.

micro
Microboone Detector

mini
Miniboone

LArIAT—Liquid-Argon TPC In A Test beam—is a small version of MicroBooNE, with a capacity for about three-quarters of a ton of liquid argon instead of MicroBooNE’s 170 tons. Its aim is to study particle tracks to better understand how different types of particles – in particular electrons and photons—interact in liquid argon, and how these interactions appear in the collected data.

‘Understanding what a proton track looks like in comparison to a pion track or a kaon track is one of the goals of LArIAT,’ said Jennifer Raaf, a spokesperson for the experiment.”

See the full article here.

Fermilab campus

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.


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