From Caltech: “Caltech Team Produces Squeezed Light Using a Silicon Micromechanical System”

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Caltech

08/07/2013
Kimm Fesenmaier

“One of the many counterintuitive and bizarre insights of quantum mechanics is that even in a vacuum—what many of us think of as an empty void—all is not completely still. Low levels of noise, known as quantum fluctuations, are always present. Always, that is, unless you can pull off a quantum trick. And that’s just what a team led by researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has done. The group has engineered a miniature silicon system that produces a type of light that is quieter at certain frequencies—meaning it has fewer quantum fluctuations—than what is usually present in a vacuum.

quant
(a) SEM image of the silicon micromechanical resonator used to generate squeezed light. Light is coupled into the device using a narrow waveguide and reflects off a back mirror formed by a linear array of etched holes. Upon reflection, the light interacts with a pair of double-nanobeams (micromechanical resonator/optical cavity), which are deflected in a way that tends to cancel fluctuations in the light. (b) Numerical model of the differential in-plane motion of the nanobeams. Credit: Caltech/Amir Safavi-Naeini, Simon Groeblacher, and Jeff Hill

This special type of light with fewer fluctuations is known as squeezed light and is useful for making precise measurements at lower power levels than are required when using normal light. Although other research groups previously have produced squeezed light, the Caltech team’s new system, which is miniaturized on a silicon microchip, generates the ultraquiet light in a way that can be more easily adapted to a variety of sensor applications.

‘This system should enable a new set of precision microsensors capable of beating standard limits set by quantum mechanics,’ says Oskar Painter, a professor of applied physics at Caltech and the senior author on a paper that describes the system; the paper appears in the August 8 issue of the journal Nature. ‘Our experiment brings together, in a tiny microchip package, many aspects of work that has been done in quantum optics and precision measurement over the last 40 years.'”

See the full article here.

The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech) is a private research university located in Pasadena, California, United States. Caltech has six academic divisions with strong emphases on science and engineering. Its 124-acre (50 ha) primary campus is located approximately 11 mi (18 km) northeast of downtown Los Angeles. “The mission of the California Institute of Technology is to expand human knowledge and benefit society through research integrated with education. We investigate the most challenging, fundamental problems in science and technology in a singularly collegial, interdisciplinary atmosphere, while educating outstanding students to become creative members of society.”
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