From Symmetry: “Midwest muon experiments carry on East Coast legacy”

As researchers across the United States—and around the world—plan two new supersymmetry-hunting experiments to be located at Fermilab, symmetry writer Joseph Piergrossi sat down with collaborators from Boston University to learn more about the projects’ goals and history.

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Joseph Piergrossi, General Science Writer, Journalist and Educator

January 10, 2013
Joseph Piergrossi

This spring, scientists at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory [Fermilab] will break ground on the buildings for a Muon Campus. The two initial experiments proposed for the campus draw on three decades of technological advances to turn muons into supersensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model

Standard Model
Standard Model (w/Higgs)

“With the Muon g-2 experiment, scientists aim to discover signs of subatomic particles and forces that have eluded detection by other experiments. It will be more sensitive to virtual or hidden particles and forces than any previous experiment of its kind. The Mu2e experiment will test a fundamental symmetry of the quantum world.

Muon g-2 (pronounced g minus two), the first experiment to be installed in the new Muon Campus at Fermilab, has its roots in a muon experiment of the same name that ran from 1997 to 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. ‘The muon is very sensitive to the hidden presence of new physics,’ says Lee Roberts, professor of physics at Boston University and co-spokesperson for the Muon g-2 experiment.

The Brookhaven Muon g-2 experiment had its inception in 1982, when Yale physicist Vernon Hughes suggested an experiment to measure the magnetic dipole moment of the muon 20 times better than previous experiments run at CERN in the 1970s. He and Roberts were the co-spokespeople for the Brookhaven project and headed the design of the experiment, which eventually involved scientists from 14 institutions in five countries.

Boston University has had a major stake in the Muon g-2 experiments at Brookhaven and now at Fermilab. In the early 1990s, the university provided the facilities to construct many important components of the muon ring. It was one of a half dozen institutions that ‘played a crucial role’ in the experiment, says Brookhaven’s Bill Morse, former resident spokesperson for the Muon g-2 project.

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The Muon g-2 Experiment at BNL

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The new campus at Fermilab

See the full article here.

Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.


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