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  • richardmitnick 12:49 pm on March 18, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , World Wide Web   

    From CERN: “£1 million Engineering prize honours web pioneers” 

    CERN New Masthead

    March 18, 2013
    Cian O’Luanaigh

    Five engineers whose work, beginning in the 1970s, led to the internet and the World Wide Web have together won the inaugural £1 million Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering.

    tb
    Tim Berners-Lee, pictured at CERN with the NeXT computer that he used to invent the World Wide Web. Berners-Lee shares the £1 million Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering with four other engineers (Image: CERN)

    Sharing the prize are Robert Kahn, Vinton Cerf and Louis Pouzin for their contributions to the protocols that make up the fundamental architecture of the internet, Tim Berners-Lee who created the World Wide Web at CERN in 1989, and Marc Andreessen who wrote the Mosaic browser that is credited with popularising the World Wide Web.

    See the full article here.

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New

    LHC

    CERN LHC New

    LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries


    ScienceSprings is powered by MAINGEAR computers

     
  • richardmitnick 6:01 pm on January 27, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , World Wide Web   

    CERN and the Birth of the World Wide Web 

    CERN New Masthead

    CERN

    THIS IS THE THIRD IN A SERIES OF POSTS ABOUT SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF CERN.

    The birth of the web

    The World Wide Web, invented at CERN in 1989 by British scientist Tim Berners-Lee, has grown to revolutionize communications worldwide.
    TB

    Tim Berners-Lee, a British scientist at CERN, invented the World Wide Web (WWW) in 1989. The web was originally conceived and developed to meet the demand for automatic information-sharing between scientists in universities and institutes around the world.

    CERN is not an isolated laboratory, but rather a focus for an extensive community that includes more than 10,000 scientists from over 100 countries. Although they typically spend some time on the CERN site, the scientists usually work at universities and national laboratories in their home countries. Good contact is therefore essential.

    The basic idea of the WWW was to merge the technologies of personal computers, computer networking and hypertext into a powerful and easy to use global information system.

    How the web began

    Berners-Lee wrote the first proposal for the World Wide Web at CERN in 1989, further refining the proposal with Belgian systems engineer Robert Cailliau the following year. On 12 November 1990 the pair published a formal proposal outlining principal concepts and defining important terms behind the web. The document described a “hypertext project” called “WorldWideWeb” in which a “web” of “hypertext documents” could be viewed by “browsers”.

    By the end of 1990, prototype software for a basic web system was already being demonstrated. An interface was provided to encourage its adoption, and applied to the CERN computer centre’s documentation, its help service and Usenet newsgroups; concepts already familiar to people at CERN. The first examples of this interface were developed on NeXT computers.

    Info.cern.ch was the address of the world’s first website and web server, running on a NeXT computer at CERN. The first web page address was

    Info.cern.ch was the address of the world’s first website and web server, running on a NeXT computer at CERN. The first web page address was

    http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html

    The first web server in the US came online in December 1991, once again in a particle physics laboratory: the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California.”

    Please visit the full page and follow the links to read much more of the story.

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New

    LHC

    CERN LHC New

    LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries


    ScienceSprings is powered by MAINGEAR computers

     
  • richardmitnick 11:45 am on April 15, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: World Wide Web   

    From Fermilab Today and Symmetry Breaking: “The future of the Web: from physics to fundamental right’ 

    “Countless scientific tools have made their way from the lab bench to everyday life. But perhaps none have been more pervasive than the World Wide Web. Developed by Tim Berners-Lee at CERN in 1989 as a way to manage project information at the laboratory, the Web has since infiltrated the globe and affected the way we communicate, educate, entertain, inform and govern.

    i1
    Tim Berners-Lee (left) and Gordon Brown discuss the future of the Web in front of an audience at the University of Geneva. Photo by Felipe Fink Grael.

    Twenty years after the technology became a publicly available service, the future of the Web remains a widely debated topic. “

    See the full article here or here .

     
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