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  • richardmitnick 4:31 pm on July 10, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From SETI: Alfonso Davila 


    SETI Institute

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    A research scientist at the SETI Institute and the NASA Ames Research Center in California since 2009, has substantial experience in Earth and Planetary sciences. As an undergraduate in Spain, he studied marine sciences and was trained in marine biology, chemistry, geology and physics, with a later focus in marine geology and physics for his Masters degree (1996-2001). He obtained a PhD in Germany studying bio-geophysics, and the interactions between the Earth’s magnetic field and biological systems (2001-2005). His Post-Doc at NASA Ames in California, brought him to work on the habitability of Mars through the study of Mars Analog Environments on Earth (2006-2009). This greatly broadened his experience in field geology and biology. Alfonso has been a guest speaker in international conferences and a guest lecturer in universities and research institutes in the US, Canada, South America and Europe, and has published more than 50 scientific papers and book chapters in these fields.


    Alfonso’s research interests are broad, spanning from planetary habitability, geology and geochemistry, to the origin and evolution of life on Earth. He is particularly interested in the geologic, geochemical, and climatic evolution of Mars, and how this evolution affected the habitability of the planet from its origins and up to the present. He is also interested in comparing the evolution of Mars and Earth through field research in Mars Analog Environments such as the Antarctic Dry Valleys, the high Arctic, or the Atacama Desert, combined with laboratory work, numerical modeling, and the analysis of remote sensing data. He is currently working in several international science and engineering projects in the field of planetary sciences.

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    SETI Institute scientist Alfonso Davila measuring the thickness of ice to understand the lake evolution. Photo credit: Dale Andersen

    See the full article here. If you like, there is a one hour YouTube video of a talk by Alfonso Davila on this page.

    SETI Institute – 189 Bernardo Ave., Suite 100
    Mountain View, CA 94043
    Phone 650.961.6633 – Fax 650-961-7099
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  • richardmitnick 11:00 am on June 4, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From SETI: “Meet Our Scientists – Cynthia-Phillips” 


    SETI Institute

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    An expert in processing spacecraft images of the planets, Cynthia Phillips is particularly interested in the search for active geological processes on such worlds as Mars, Europa, Io, and Enceladus. Regions of current, ongoing geological activity are particularly germane from an astrobiological perspective because they could represent locations where liquid water could be present today. Such active regions are also places where material from underneath could be brought up to the surface, where it’s much easier for scientists to detect using either remote sensing techniques or landed spacecraft.

    Cynthia has compared the images taken of Jupiter’s moons Europa and Io by the Galileo and Voyager spacecraft to search for any changes that may have occurred on their surfaces. In the case of Europa, which is believed to have a mammoth, liquid ocean beneath its icy surface, active regions would pinpoint locations where liquid water is located close to the crust. Such areas would be important targets for a future Europa spacecraft mission, and perhaps one day could be landing sites. While she has not yet found any such active regions on Europa, Cynthia continues to search the Galileo dataset. She has also used her detection techniques to document ongoing volcanic activity on Jupiter’s pizza-like moon, Io.

    NASA Galileo
    NASA/Galileo

    NASA Voyager
    NASA/Voyager

    Cynthia is also interested in active geologic processes on other moons and planets, including investigations of dark slope streaks on Mars which would be related to liquid water at or near the surface. She has studied fluvial features on Saturn’s moon Titan, and is currently using stereo photogrammetry to create 3d models of the surfaces of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn to study crater relaxation, which can provide insights into subsurface thermal structure and history.

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    Cynthia’s interests in education have led to the two student internship programs she runs. The SETI Institute Astrobiology Research Experience for Undergraduates program (http://www.seti.org/reu), funded by the NSF, brings about 15 college students to the SETI Institute each summer from all over the country for a 10-week science internship program. Cynthia also runs the URSA internship program (http://www.seti.org/ursa), funded by NASA, which pairs 6 undergraduates from nearby San Jose State University with SETI Institute scientists for a paid academic-year internship.

    In addition to her scientific research, Cynthia is also the co-author of over a dozen popular-level books on subjects including Einstein, Astronomy, and Space Exploration. One of her most recent books is Space Exploration for Dummies.

    See the full article here.

    SETI Institute – 189 Bernardo Ave., Suite 100
    Mountain View, CA 94043
    Phone 650.961.6633 – Fax 650-961-7099
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  • richardmitnick 4:31 pm on May 16, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From SETI Institute: “Meet Our Scientists – Janice Bishop” 


    SETI Institute

    Janice Bishop is a chemist and Senior Planetary scientist at the SETI Institute who explores the planet Mars using spectroscopy. Her investigations of CRISM data of Mars are revealing clays and sulfates in the ancient rocks that provide information about the geochemical environment at the time the minerals formed.

    Bishop studies the spectral fingerprints of minerals and rocks in the lab in order to generate a spectral library for identification of these in the Martian data. Her research also involves collecting and studying Mars analog rocks and soils at a variety of locations including volcanic islands, cold deserts, hydrothermal regions, acidic aqueous sites, and meteorites which are the only Martian samples available on Earth to date.

    Another component of Bishop’s research is collecting spectra under Mars-like conditions. Spectra of many hydrated minerals change depending on the moisture level in the air and the amount of water molecules adsorbed on the surface or bound in the mineral structure. Understanding the spectral properties of mineral mixtures in the lab is also important for identifying minerals on Mars and Dr. Bishop’s group is preparing and characterizing the spectral properties of several mixture suites.

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    Janice Bishop in the field

    Excerpts from an interview with Janice Bishop – by Gail Jacobs

    Minerals have a unique signature that is like a fingerprint. They show up as small peaks and dips in the spectrum. By looking for these dips, peaks and curves, we can identify minerals on the planet. In order to identify minerals on Mars, however, we need to study minerals in the lab and at field locations analogous to Mars, which are two other projects of mine.

    I have several ongoing projects, which all primarily relate to mineralogy on Mars. We are trying to identify the ancient rocks on the planet – rocks that contain clays, sulfates and other minerals that formed under aqueous conditions. These findings will allow us to look for areas where water might have been present on the planet and where life might have been a possibility.

    We are finding many of these clays in the really ancient rocks. It’s like having access to this clear window back into time on the planet Mars. We do not have that option for Earth because our planet has been “contaminated” by life. Our planet is a host to all types of plants and animals that have changed the planet substantially in the past 4 billion years. But on Mars, the clay minerals in particular can tell us a lot about the geochemical environment 4 billion years ago; and that helps us understand what the planet was like then and if life might have evolved. Whether life did or did not evolve is interesting and helps us further understand evolution of life on our planet Earth, and that is pretty cool.

    A lot of people are curious about Earth’s evolutionary process. One of the big reasons we might care about how life evolved on Mars is because this information could help reveal more about our own planet. We hope to learn how those minerals on Mars formed and whether or not life evolved. Studying the clays and understanding how Mars’ early geochemical environment changed will help tell us whether or not there was life there and how it might have evolved. And that information can help us better understand how life might have evolved here on Earth.

    When asked what motivates her to do what she does.

    I love what I do! I love my projects. I don’t really ever put them away; they are always traveling with me. Occasionally I’ll wake up at night with a great idea, then write it down and go back to sleep. Often I get an idea while I’m listening to a lecture or waiting for an appointment — the ideas always bubble up. The thoughts are always there and the projects are always working in the back of my mind. It is just a part of my life.

    From Janice Bishop’s Profile:

    Janice Bishop
    Senior Research Scientist
    Degree/Major:
    PhD Chemistry; MS Remote Sensing (Earth Science)
    Curriculum Vitae:
    Discipline:
    Planetary Geology, Spectroscopy, Mineralogy
    Curiosity about how life might have evolved on Mars could help reveal more about our own planet.

    Major Awards

    2012- Helmholtz International Fellow Award.
    2011- Public Service Group Achievement Award to the MRO CRISM Instrument Team for developing the highly capable CRISM instrument, significantly advancing our understanding of the Martian surface, its composition and evolution.
    2010- Characterization of “Water on Mars” by the MRO Team selected as one of Science Magazine’s Top Ten Insights of the Decade.
    2010- Featured Scientist, “A Day in the Life of an Astronomer” Astronomy Magazine, March issue.
    2009- Best Paper Award, IEEE Whispers conference “Hyperspectral Image and Signal Processing: Evolution in Remote Sensing” (co-author), Grenoble, France.
    2008- Kavli Fellow; invited to 18th Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium, Irvine, CA.

    Janice Bishop

    Dr. Janice Bishop is a chemist and planetary scientist who explores the planet Mars using spectroscopy. Her investigations of CRISM data of Mars are revealing clays and sulfates in the ancient rocks that provide information about the geochemical environment at the time the minerals formed. Dr. Bishop studies the spectral fingerprints of minerals and rocks in the lab in order to generate a spectral library for identification of these in the Martian data. Her research also involves collecting and studying Mars analog rocks and soils at a variety of locations including volcanic islands, cold deserts, hydrothermal regions, acidic aqueous sites, and meteorites which are the only Martian samples available on Earth to date.

    Another component of Dr. Bishop’s research is collecting spectra under Mars-like conditions. Spectra of many hydrated minerals change depending on the moisture level in the air and the amount of water molecules adsorbed on the surface or bound in the mineral structure. Understanding the spectral properties of mineral mixtures in the lab is also important for identifying minerals on Mars and Dr. Bishop’s group is preparing and characterizing the spectral properties of several mixture suites.

    See the full article here.

    SETI Institute – 189 Bernardo Ave., Suite 100
    Mountain View, CA 94043
    Phone 650.961.6633 – Fax 650-961-7099
    Privacy PolicyQuestions and Comments


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  • richardmitnick 1:07 pm on May 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From SETI Institute: “Meet Our Scientists – Elisa Quintana” 


    SETI Institute

    May 8, 2014

    Elisa Quintana is a Research Scientist with the SETI Institute and NASA Ames Research Center where she works on the Kepler Mission to help search for and characterize extrasolar planets. Most recently, she led a team of astronomers to confirm Kepler-186f, the first Earth-sized planet found to orbit within the habitable zone of another star. Her research also includes creating computer models to study the formation, dynamical stability and habitability of rocky planets within and beyond our solar system.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c6/Exoplanet_Comparison_Kepler-186_f.png/300px-Exoplanet_Comparison_Kepler-186_f.png
    Size comparison of Kepler-186 f with Earth

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    A Q & A with Elisa Quintana

    How long have you been working on the Kepler Mission?

    I joined the SETI Institute in 2006 to work on Kepler, several years before the spacecraft was launched into space. I came to NASA Ames in 1999 as a graduate student to work on the Vulcan Camera project, a ground-based exoplanet search program at Lick Observatory which was a precursor to the Kepler mission, and I’ve been at NASA Ames ever since. I’ve been fortunate to have witnessed all of the stages of Kepler, including the early technology demonstrations, the selection as a NASA Discovery Mission in 2001, the launch at Kennedy Space Flight Center in 2009 and the many exciting discoveries since then!

    Describe your role in the Kepler Mission.

    For the past few years I’ve been working on modeling the thousands of Kepler’s “Objects of Interest” (KOIs), helping to determine which KOIs are good planet candidates by refining the star/planet parameters, and working towards confirming and characterizing some of the more interesting and promising planet candidates. I’ve also remained active in planet formation research, and it’s much more fun now to develop models when you have observations to constrain your theories (we now have hundeds of exosolar systems, whereas a decade ago we just had one, our own solar system). It’s also fun to see new discoveries test your previous theories. Exoplanet science is a fast-moving field, and perfect for my attention span.

    If we were going to observe you at work, what would we see?

    You would see me typing away on my laptop (not very interesting!). For many years I worked in a cubicle, but a few years ago I graduated to an office with a window that faces the Moffett Field landing strip. I get to see all sorts of planes and jets take off and land, including Air Force One sometimes! When I’m not staring out the window, I’m either programming or working on a manuscript.

    Professionally, what are the most rewarding aspects of your job?

    I enjoy collaborating with scientists around the globe. Everyone has their own specialties, so I find it very rewarding when a project comes to completion, seeing all of the pieces come together — all of the Kepler discoveries are truly a large team effort. I also enjoy traveling to conferences to present my work and build new collaborations.

    What do you currently consider your biggest challenge?

    Finding a job in the field (Astrophysics) that I spent thirteen years in school, and another decade afterwards, preparing for. I would love to continue my research with SETI, but it will always depend on winning very competitive grants every few years. There are definitely sacrifices you have to make in order to do the work that you love to do.

    How can the Kepler data impact future space missions?

    One of Kepler’s goals is to determine the frequency of Earth-size planets in the habitable zones of other stars. The discovery of Kepler-186f is a major step towards this goal and also proves that these types of planets exist around M dwarfs, the most abundant type of star. Discoveries like Kepler-186f motivate further research on these types of planets. NASA’s James Webb telescope (a successor to Hubble) will have the potential to probe the atmospheres of nearby planets around M dwarfs looking for biomarkers, which are essentially elements that could only be attributed to life on that planet. To prepare for this mission, we should try to learn everything we can about planets orbiting red dwarfs, and knowing that they actually exist helps to justify this.

    k186f
    An artist’s concept depicts Kepler-186f, the first validated Earth-size planet orbiting a distant star in the habitable zone—a range of distances from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet. Kepler-186f resides in the Kepler-186 system about 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus. The discovery of Kepler-186f confirms that Earth-size planets exist in the habitable zone of other stars and signals a significant step closer to finding a world similar to Earth. (Download full size image) Credit: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyl

    What first sparked your interest in science and astronomy in particular?

    I was a late bloomer. I wasn’t one of those people who looked up at the sky when they were five and knew they wanted to be an astronaut. It wasn’t until college when I started to realize that I sort of enjoyed math and physics. I went to a Junior college after high school and during this time I still had no idea what I wanted to do. Once I decided to pursue physics, I transferred to UC, San Diego and my advisor was Sally Ride. That was my first NASA stint, I worked at the California Space Institute on Sally Ride’s pet project KidSat (now EarthKam), which was a camera onboard the space shuttle that took photos of Earth, the locations of which were selected by school kids. From that time on, I’ve always been affiliated with some sort of NASA project.

    What motivates you?

    Knowing that it’s very possible that we – mankind – might discover life beyond planet Earth in the next few decades. Either with SETI monitoring other stars to detect engineered signals coming from other advanced civilizations, small satellites searching for life in the moons of our solar system, or with future space missions searching for biomarkers in the atmospheres of exoplanets. It’s all very exciting science, and given that mankind has been pondering whether life on Earth is unique for thousands of years, we’re all very fortunate to live in this generation where we are close to solving the question of “Are We Alone?”.

    What was your dream job as a child?

    I wanted to be a ballerina or a drummer (and I secretly still want to be both).

    If you were speaking to a group of teens about your career, what would you tell them?

    That its never too late to pursue your passion, no matter how well you’ve done in the past. Of course, doing well in school makes things much easier, but you shouldn’t let any past performance or time lag deter you. It’s ok to take lots of time to decide what you want to do, but once you decide, just go for it full force.

    Who do you admire and why?

    I admire the visionaries that made Kepler what it is today. Bill Borucki wrote a paper in 1984 on the photometric technique to detect exoplanets, and worked for 30 years to get the satellite in space and data down to Earth. Several others, including SETI’s CEO David Black, were part of that movement. People like myself happen to be at NASA at the right time and get to cherry pick through the goldmine that is Kepler data. I would love to be able to work on something in the near future that would one day provide revolutionary data for the next generation of scientists.

    What is your favorite vacation destination?

    My family lives in San Diego so I visit quite often. It always feels like a vacation since all we do is swim, barbeque and watch Chargers football. On my wishlist is a trip to the Greek Islands. I went to a conference years ago in Santorini, Greece. I loved the country, the food the culture, and I can’t wait to go back. Maybe I will retire there one day.

    How do you spend your free time?

    Working on science papers or exploring San Francisco. For a city that is 7 miles by 7 miles, it never gets old, ever.

    What is the coolest thing about your job?

    Witnessing the discoveries! My thesis from 2004 was on “planet formation in binary star systems”, so of course I was thrilled when Kepler started detecting circumbinary planets. In 2007 I did some theoretical work on planet formation around M dwarfs, and here we are finding small planets around M dwarfs. We knew these types of “extreme solar systems” had to exist, but to see and participate in some of these discoveries has been a bit surreal!

    Then there are days that are just fun. While working on the Kepler-186 system, we were lucky to have some wonderful artists create some illustrations for the system. There was one day where I was doing research on what these planets around M dwarfs might look like (to provide some guidance to the artists), and I just thought to myself, I can’t believe that my job is to sit at my desk and imagine what other worlds might look like. Of course some days are tougher than others, but its times like that where I feel really fortunate to be able to work for SETI and NASA.

    If you had a one-year sabbatical to learn something entirely new, what would it be?

    I never thought I’d say this, but I’d love to learn more biology. To me, adding the “Astro” in front of biology makes it much more interesting. I would love to learn Astrobiology so I could help understand how we might be able to detect life on other moons or planets. There are people that work on studying whether plant photosynthesis could occur on other planets (for example, under the infrared radiation from red dwarfs). Mapping everything we know about life on Earth to what would happen on planets around other types of stars sounds like fun.

    What’s in store for you in the future?

    I love doing pure research. Now that we have so many exoplanetary systems to study and so much more data to explore, I look forward every day to solving some of the puzzles that will help us understand how Earth-like planets form, and what makes a planet habitable.

    See the full article here.

    From her Bio page
    Dr. Elisa Quintana is a Research Scientist with the SETI Institute and NASA Ames Research Center where she works on the Kepler Mission to help search for and characterize extrasolar planets. Most recently, she led a team of astronomers to confirm Kepler-186f, the first Earth-sized planet found to orbit within the habitable zone of another star. Her research also includes creating computer models to study the formation, dynamical stability and habitability of rocky planets within and beyond our solar system.

    Dr. Quintana received a B.S. in Physics from the University of California, San Diego. Her interest in space research began while working at the California Space Institute at UCSD with former astronaut and physics professor Dr. Sally Ride on a project called KidSat (now EarthKam). The program consisted of a camera onboard the space shuttle that took photos of the Earth selected by school children, and Quintana’s role was to coordinate the space shuttle orbits with the locations on Earth. After college, she spent the summer (1997) in the NASA Academy program at Goddard Space Flight Center where she worked with Dr. Elihu Boldt on a feasibility study of an inflatable large x-ray collector satellite. She spent an additional summer (1998) at Goddard working with Dr. Ramona Kessel to measure the Earth’s magnetosphere with Geotail satellite data.

    She moved to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1997 for her graduate studies where she earned an M.S. in Physics and an M.S. in Aerospace Science (with a specialty in Astrodynamics). During this time she worked with Dr. Lennard Fisk to measure the Sun’s differential rotation with SOHO data. In 1999, she received a NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program fellowship which allowed her to move to NASA Ames Research Center in California to perform her thesis research with a NASA scientist. She worked with Dr. Jack Lissauer at Ames and Dr. Fred Adams at the University of Michigan to create computer models to study planet formation in binary star systems, focusing on the Alpha Centauri system. She also worked with Dr. Bill Borucki on the Vulcan Planet Search Program at Lick Observatory, which was a ground-based search for exoplanets and a proof-of-concept project for the Kepler Mission (which was officially selected as a NASA Discovery Mission in 2001).

    Dr. Quintana received her Ph.D. in Physics in 2004 and continued her planet formation research from 2004 – 2006 through a NASA Postdoctoral Program (NPP) fellowship. In 2006, she joined the SETI Institute to work on the Kepler mission as a scientic programmer. For five years she worked on the software that calibrates the flight data and validates planetary candidates, receiving a 2010 NASA Software of the Year Award for her contributions. She was also a member of the Kepler Data Analysis Working Group, helping to improve the quality of the processed Kepler flight data for use by the astronomical community. In 2011 she began work with Dr. Jason Rowe to model and refine the star and planet parameters for the thousands of Kepler planet candidates. During this time, she developed a method to confirm planets using only Kepler photometry (without the need for expensive follow-up observations from large ground-based telescopes) by measuring light reflected from a planet. She also contributed to numerous exoplanet discovery and characterization papers, including the confirmation of Kepler-186f. She will soon begin a NASA Senior NPP Fellowship (link http://nasa.orau.org/postdoc/) at Ames Research Center where she will again work with Dr. Borucki, this time using Kepler observations of multiple-planet systems to refine her models of planet formation and habitability.

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    Mountain View, CA 94043
    Phone 650.961.6633 – Fax 650-961-7099
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