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  • richardmitnick 3:37 pm on September 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers: “Railway Platform Gap Bridging Unit” 

    Rutgers University
    Rutgers University

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    Invention Summary

    In a recent report sponsored by the New Jersey Department of Transportation, it was found that car/platform gap injuries accounted for 25% of all injuries on NJ TRANSIT Rail lines, including death. Similar findings have been reported by other agencies, including the Long Island Rail Road and the Metropolitan Transit Agency of New York. These results prompted the Federal Railroad Safety Advisory Committee to address the seriousness of the car/platform gap issue.

    Researchers at Rutgers University have developed an apparatus that dynamically fills the gap between the door sill of a commuter rail train car and the station platform. This innovative trapdoor unit incorporates an automated slide for bridging a train/platform gap up to 15 inches wide. The unit is specific to train cars fitted with trapdoor system for high-low level platform service. The unit is based on the profile/ footprint of the existing trapdoors of multi-level cars currently in service on NJ Transit and other lines which allows the unit to be a retrofitted to an existing train car, with no structural modifications. The gap bridging slide is actuated by a simple motor/power screw arrangement for high reliability and direct operation by 72 volts DC, consistent with carriage equipment supply voltage.

    This technology enables passenger safety, where the gap bridging slide extends until a proximity sensor detects engagement with any object, at which the extension promptly ceases. The gap bridging slide forms a rigid structure cantilever that is designed to handle traffic up to 1000 lbs., and extends up to 12 inches. In addition, the unit is fitted with a motion sensor that measures the actual size of the gap each time the slide is extended; thus allowing real-time measurements recorded to create a history of gap size at each station. The unit weights 140 lbs (less than currently fitted trap doors weighing 180 lb.) and costs about $2800 per unit. The unit has a built-in, hard wired control only requiring an etension/ retraction signal for operation/synchronization with the rail carriage doors’s open actuation.

    The apparatus serves two current needs: 1) The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirement that passengers in wheelchairs and other mobility-impaired travelers have accessibility to get on and off passenger trains and 2) Protection against slip and fall injuries to passengers due to excessive gaps between the train and the platform.
    Market Application
    Can be used for passenger protection on railcars of a particular design in which high level platforms are serviced by a trap door, which is a common configuration on many U.S. commuter railcars.
    Advantages

    Minimum implementation cost
    Simple control/maintenance requirements
    No modification to carriage structure

    Intellectual Property & Development Status
    Patent pending

    See the full article here.

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

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  • richardmitnick 12:26 pm on September 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers: “Rutgers Physics Professors Find New Order in Quantum Electronic Material” 

    Rutgers University
    Rutgers University

    January 30, 2013
    Media Contact: Carl Blesch
    732-932-7084 x616
    E-mail: cblesch@ur.rutgers.edu

    May open door to new kinds of materials, magnets and superconductors

    Two Rutgers physics professors have proposed an explanation for a new type of order, or symmetry, in an exotic material made with uranium – a theory that may one day lead to enhanced computer displays and data storage systems and more powerful superconducting magnets for medical imaging and levitating high-speed trains.

    pc
    Piers Coleman

    Their discovery, published in this week’s issue of the journal Nature, has piqued the interest of scientists worldwide. It is one of the rare theory-only papers that this selective publication accepts. Typically the journal’s papers describe results of laboratory experimentation.

    Collaborating with the Rutgers professors was a postdoctoral researcher at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) who earned her doctorate at Rutgers.

    “Scientists have seen this behavior for 25 years, but it has eluded explanation.” said Piers Coleman, professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the School of Arts and Sciences. When cooled to 17.5 degrees above absolute zero or lower (a bone-chilling minus 428 degrees Fahrenheit), the flow of electricity through this material changes subtly.

    The material essentially acts like an electronic version of polarized sunglasses, he explains. Electrons behave like tiny magnets, and normally these magnets can point in any direction. But when they flow through this cooled material, they come out with their magnetic fields aligned with the material’s main crystal axis.

    This effect, claims Coleman, comes from a new type of hidden order, or symmetry, in this material’s magnetic and electronic properties. Changes in order are what make liquid crystals, magnetic materials and superconductors work and perform useful functions.

    “Our quest to understand new types of order is a vital part of understanding how materials can be developed to benefit the world around us,” he said.

    Similar discoveries have led to technologies such as liquid crystal displays, which are now ubiquitous in flat-screen TVs, computers and smart phones, although the scientists are quick to acknowledge that their theoretical discovery won’t transform high-tech products overnight.

    pc
    Premala Chandra
    Nick Romanenko

    Coleman, along with Rutgers colleague Premala Chandra and MIT collaborator Rebecca Flint, describe what they call a “hidden order” in this compound of uranium, ruthenium and silicon. Uranium is commonly known for being nuclear reactor fuel or weapons material, but in this case physicists value it as a heavy metal with electrons that behave differently than those in common metals.

    Recent experiments on the material at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico provided the three physicists with data to refine their discovery.

    “We’ve dubbed our fundamental new order ‘hastatic’ order, named after the Greek word for spear,” said Chandra, also a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. The name reflects the highly ordered properties of the material and its effect on aligning electrons that flow through it.

    “This new category of order may open the world to new kinds of materials, magnets, superconductors and states of matter with properties yet unknown,” she said. The scientists have predicted other instances where hastatic order may show up, and physicists are beginning to test for it.

    The scientists’ work was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Simons Foundation. Flint is a Simons Postdoctoral Fellow in physics at MIT.

    See the full article here.

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

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  • richardmitnick 10:10 am on September 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , New Technology, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers- “Novel Local Morphologic Scale: Applications in Disease Diagnosis and Prognosis” 

    Rutgers University
    Rutgers University

    Rutgers Technology

    Invention Summary

    Timely and accurate diagnosis of disease pathologies is critical to providing effective treatment to patients. Rutgers scientists have developed a novel local morphologic scale (LMS) to rapidly and automatically select, quantify and classify tissue/specimen topologies using parallelized computations. This unique tool has the ability to define features for every special image location and generate subsequent scene segmentation and classification for each location. Further this technology is free from shape constraints and generates output based on local structure attributes of complex histological images. This innovation has been successfully utilized in discriminating tumor versus stromal regions by classifying oncogenic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (biomarker) in ovarian cancer tissue microarrays. Additionally, this technology has been applied across 3 other domains (prostate, breast) under two different stains illustrating its robustness to domain selection. This technology can be immensely useful to identify regions of interest, model heterogeneity of the underlying topology and generate digital signatures. It can also be used to train supervised classifiers to identify similar structural signatures in an image and therefore reduce or eliminate and observer variability.

    Market Application

    Disease Diagnosis, Digital Pathology, Histopathology, Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD), Tissue Classification, Disease Monitoring and Prognosis, Lymphocyte Infiltration, Cancer.

    Advantages

    Signatures derived from cancerous versus non-cancerous tissues differ greatly. This tool can be highly instrumental in classifying cancerous versus non-cancerous tissue, can reliably and accurately account for cell shape and phenotypes, and provide accurate tissue classification, enabling pathologists to visually discern the two regions.

    Intellectual Property & Development Status
    Patent pending.

    Select Publication
    Janowczyk, A, Chandran S, Feldman MD, Madabhushi A. (2011). Local morphologic scale: Application to segmenting tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in ovarian cancer TMAs. SPIE http://lcib.rutgers.edu/publications/ Andrew/SPIE2011.pdf

    See the full articled here.

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

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  • richardmitnick 3:53 pm on August 1, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “Astrophysics Professor Creates Computer Models that Help Explain How Galaxies Formed and Evolved” 

    Rutgers Banner
    Rutgers University

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    Rachel Somerville (Photo: Miguel Acevedo)

    July 30, 2014
    Carl Blesch

    When most people think of astronomers, they envision scientists who spend time peering at stars and galaxies through telescopes on high mountain tops. Rutgers astronomer Rachel Somerville depends on colleagues who make such observations, but her primary tools for understanding how galaxies formed billions of years ago – and how they continue to evolve today – are large computers.

    The quality and significance of her work were affirmed this week when the Simons Foundation, a private foundation that sponsors research in mathematics and the basic sciences, awarded Somerville $500,000 in research support over five years. She is one of 16 theoretical scientists at American and Canadian universities who were named Simons Investigators for 2014.

    A professor of astrophysics in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, School of Arts and Sciences, Somerville creates computer models or simulations of the physical principles that underlie galaxy formation. These models help astronomers make sense of what they see when the Hubble Space Telescope and other instruments peer into the farthest reaches of space and reveal how galaxies looked as they took shape in a young universe.

    The Simons Foundation cited her contributions to the development of “semianalytic modeling methods that combine computational and pencil-and-paper theory.” According to the group, these contributions have helped scientists understand how the growth of supermassive black holes and the energy they release is linked to a galaxy’s properties and its ability to form stars.

    Somerville explains that astronomers cannot see any single galaxy evolve through a telescope.

    “We see galaxies at different points in their lifetimes and in different wavelengths,” she said, referring to images acquired with visible light, radio waves and X-rays. Models then help astronomers predict which kinds of early galaxies evolved into disks like our Milky Way while others evolved into the round balls of stars that astronomers call elliptical galaxies.

    As a theoretical astronomer, Somerville values the opportunities she gets to interact with observational astronomers at Rutgers and elsewhere who provide her with new data that make her models more comprehensive and robust.

    “It’s hard to make models that fit all the observations,” she said. “I try to go the extra distance to connect what the models predict with things that we can actually observe.”

    Somerville is a relative newcomer to Rutgers, appointed in October 2011 to the George A. and Margaret M. Downsbrough Chair in Astrophysics.

    In 2013, she received the Dannie Heineman Prize in Astrophysics from the American Astronomical Society and the American Institute of Physics. The prize recognizes exceptional work by mid-career astronomers, citing her for providing fundamental insights into galaxy formation and evolution using modeling, simulations, and observations.

    Before joining Rutgers, Somerville held a joint appointment as associate research professor at Johns Hopkins University and associate astronomer with tenure at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). STScI manages selection, planning and scheduling of scientific activities for the Hubble Space Telescope.

    Before that, she held faculty appointments at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Germany and the University of Michigan, and postdoctoral appointments at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and Cambridge University in the United Kingdom.

    Somerville’s goal at Rutgers is to build more expertise in galaxy formation theory and help the department’s astronomy group pursue new areas such as the study of extrasolar planets.

    “Rutgers is a great place for galaxy formation theorists because we have opportunities to interact with the excellent observational astronomers here,” she said, noting the university’s involvement with the powerful new Southern African Large Telescope, also referred to as SALT. “I’ve benefitted from supportive colleagues and contact with graduate and undergraduate students. I’m constantly inspired by their enthusiasm.”

    South African Large Telescope
    South African Large Telescope

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    Rutgers Seal


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  • richardmitnick 3:08 pm on September 14, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Rutgers University   

    From Fermilab Today: “CMS Result – Precision smashing” 


    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Friday, Sept. 14, 2012
    Jim Pivarski

    It is sometimes said that if particle physicists wanted to figure out how an expensive Swiss watch works, they would smash it and deduce its structure from the cogs, springs and glass that fly apart.

    [The first place I saw this what? analogy? metaphor? was in the 1985 PBS video Creation of the Universe with Timothy Ferris describing Lawrence's first hand held collider. I just watched this video again the other day. It still holds up quite well.]

    To understand the inner life of protons, this is exactly what they do—smash two of them together and analyze the aftermath. It is not as ridiculous as it sounds. The basic laws of energy and momentum conservation make a precision science of this violent practice.

    collision
    Analyzing jets from a particle collision is something like analyzing the aftermath of the collision of two pocket-watches. CMS scientists recently analyzed collisions in which hundreds of particles seemed to be channeled into six streams.No image credit

    Energy and momentum are both quantities that describe the inertia of an object or a system of particles. Energy is the sum of motion in all directions, while momentum is the net motion, depending on direction.

    In a recent paper, CMS scientists applied an extreme version of this technique. They looked at events in which hundreds of visible particles seemed to be channeled in six streams, known as jets. Assuming that each jet was caused by a cascade of decays, starting from a single quark, they applied energy and momentum conservation to find out if triplets of quarks descended from an as-yet unknown particle.”

    ru
    The Rutgers physicists pictured above were all major contributors to this analysis.

    See the full article here.

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.


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  • richardmitnick 10:47 am on May 2, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Rutgers University   

    From Fermilab Today: “University Focus – Rutgers University” 

    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    O.K., I am not going to do every university, but I am a proud graduate of Rutgers University – University College.

    ru

    HOME TOWN:
    Piscataway, New Jersey

    PARTICLE PHYSICS COLLABORATIONS:
    CDF, DZero, CMS, MINERvA, SeaQuest

    NUMBER OF SCIENTISTS AND STUDENTS AT FERMILAB:
    Eight faculty, eight postdocs and 12 graduate students

    COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE:
    1974, starting with research on polarization and magnetic moments of hyperons.

    PARTICLE PHYSICS RESEARCH FOCUS: Rutgers is hunting the Higgs with CMS, DZero and CDF. We contribute to both the theoretical development of SUSY and its experimental verification in CMS. The theory group is also very active in the development of string theories. Rutgers scientists study the nuclear dependence of nucleon structure with MINERvA and SeaQuest.

    WHAT SETS PARTICLE PHYSICS AT RUTGERS UNIVERSITY APART?
    Rutgers is proud of the broad scope of its particle physics program. The nuclear and high-energy groups are active in projects from theory to construction, from strings to nuclei. In the spirit of Rutgers, we have, “Jersey roots, global reach,” in the particle physics world.

    FUNDING AGENCY:
    National Science Foundation

    WOW!! WHO KNEW??


    Wilson Hall

     
  • richardmitnick 11:36 am on March 27, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Rutgers University,   

    From the Wall Street Journal: “Rutgers University, IBM Open Supercomputer Center” 

    As a proud alumnus of Rutgers University, I could not let this go by.

    This is copyright protected material, so just a highlight or two.

    By HEATHER HADDON
    March 27, 2012

    “Rutgers University and International Business Machines Corp. IBM -0.02% will cut the ribbon Tuesday on a technology center in New Jersey that houses a $3.3 million supercomputer—stacks of processors that can digest massive quantities of data in a fraction of the time that a desktop unit would take.

    ibm

    i2

    Named “IBM Blue Gene/P,” the machine, about the size of two refrigerators, will be one of the most powerful computers in the Northeast, with thousands of central processing units, or CPUs. IBM hopes in the coming year it will make the prestigious “TOP 500″ list of the world’s most powerful computers, determined by a group of academic and government researchers.

    The supercomputer has similar analytical capabilities to “Watson,” the IBM computer that competed on the TV game show “Jeopardy.”

    A genome analysis that would take a year on a desktop, for example, could wrap up in a day on this computer, said Michael Pazzani, vice president for research and economic development at Rutgers in Piscataway, N.J., where the technology center is located.

    ‘This is the first step in a multiyear plan that involves IBM and Rutgers. We hope to become one of the top 10 academic computing centers in the world,’ Mr. Pazzani said.”

    See the full article here.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:58 pm on January 10, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Rutgers University   

    From ESO: “El Gordo — A ‘Fat’ Distant Galaxy Cluster” 

    el gordo

    10 January 2012

    An extremely hot, massive young galaxy cluster — the largest ever seen in the distant Universe — has been studied by an international team using ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in the Atacama Desert in Chile along with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The new results are being announced on 10 January 2012 at the 219th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Austin, Texas.

    The newly discovered galaxy cluster [1] has been nicknamed El Gordo — the “big” or “fat one” in Spanish. It consists of two separate galaxy subclusters colliding at several million kilometres per hour, and is so far away that its light has travelled for seven billion years to reach the Earth.

    ‘This cluster is the most massive, the hottest, and gives off the most X-rays of any cluster found so far at this distance or beyond,’ said Felipe Menanteau of Rutgers University, who led the study. ‘We devoted a lot of our observing time to El Gordo, and I’m glad our bet paid off and we found an amazing cluster collision.’

    The team, led by Chilean and Rutgers astronomers, found El Gordo by detecting a distortion of the cosmic microwave background radiation. This faint glow is the remnant of the first light from the Big Bang, the extremely hot and dense origin of the Universe about 13.7 billion years ago. This radiation left over from the Big Bang interacts with electrons in the hot gas in galaxy clusters, distorting the appearance of the background glow seen from Earth. The denser and bigger the cluster, the bigger this effect. El Gordo was picked up in a survey of the microwave background with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope.”

    See the full post here.

    [A personal note, I am delighted to see scientists from my alma mater, Rutgers University, working with scientists from the ESO].

    i1

    Below are the main elements of the ESO.i1
    Paranal Platform The VLT


    La Silla

    i1
    ALMA Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array

    i2
    The European Extremely Large Telescope

    ESO, the European Southern Observatory, builds and operates a suite of the world’s most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes.

     
  • richardmitnick 6:03 am on December 6, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Rutgers University   

    Rutgers University String Theorist Endows an Experimental Physics Chair with $1.5 Million Gift 

    From http://www.mycentraljersey.com

    “A Rutgers University professor has made a a $1.5 million pledge to fund a new faculty position in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

    i1

    Rutgers officials said the contribution by Claud W. Lovelace, a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the School of Arts and Sciences, is the first gift toward a $27 million challenge grant to establish 18 new endowed chairs at the university.

    The $1.5 million gift will fund a position named “the professor Claud Lovelace endowed chair in experimental condensed matter physics.

    Lovelace, who joined Rutgers in 1971, is one of the world’s first experts in string theory, a branch of physics that aims to provide a unified understanding of the basic forces and fundamental particles in nature. These include gravity, electromagnetism and forces responsible for the stability and decay of atomic nuclei. He was instrumental in the founding of the Rutgers New High Energy Theory Center, which helped Rutgers gain international recognition in the development of string theory.”

    As a graduate of Rutgers, I am delighted to see this great news.

     
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