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  • richardmitnick 12:27 pm on February 14, 2013 Permalink | Reply
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    From Richard Ruiz at Quantum Diaries: “Using Physics to Find More Physics” 

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    Richard Ruiz

    A maxim in particle physics says to use physics to find more physics!

    I forget from where or whom I first heard this saying but the idea goes something like this: When a new particle is discovered, in principle, our knowledge of the particle only consists of what we have directly measured and what the theory that lead us to its discovery tells us. The theory, of course, is most likely incorrect but that is the point. As far as we know, any newly discovered particle might have some hereto unknown quantum number. But if this is the case, then by scrutinizing a new particle we might get lucky, very luck and discover something completely unexpected. One perfect example comes from neutrino physics. After finally discovering them, physicists learned eventually how to make beams of neutrinos only to find out (1) that there are several types of neutrinos and (2) they have mass. Another example involves the W boson and brief history of modern particle colliders.

    The purpose of particle colliders like the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP), the Tevatron, or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is to test physical theories in order to ultimately figure out what works and doesn’t work.

    This is how research in high energy physics progresses: discover something new, turning it around, and throwing it back at itself. You can be certain that there is already research into scattering Higgs bosons and how this next iteration of collisions could be excellent tests of theories like technicolor, extra dimensions, or the existence of additional vector bosons. Until next time! Happy Colliding.”

    This post barely scratches at all of the information in Dr. Ruiz’ article. See the full article here.

    Participants in Quantum Diaries:

    Fermilab

    Triumf

    US/LHC Blog

    CERN

    Brookhaven Lab

    KEK


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  • richardmitnick 8:52 pm on March 15, 2012 Permalink | Reply
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    From Richard Ruiz at Quantum Diaries: “Searching for Things Not Named “Higgs” Part I: Micro Black Holes” 

    RR
    Richard Ruiz

    March 15, 2012

    “We know pretty well that gravity exists.

    Despite the number of models trying to describe gravity at the most elementary level, there is actually a phenomenon that is surprisingly common to most all of them: they all predict the existence of microscopic black holes, or at least something very close to it.

    The black holes that I am talking about, if they exist, are significantly smaller than a proton. The term ‘microscopic’ makes these things sound much bigger than they are. Secondly, the masses of micro-black holes are comparable to the energy of the LHC; consequently, they will evaporate (via Hawking radiation) and disintegrate (decay) within moments of being produced. In the off chance that a stable micro-black hole is generated, then after about 10-25 seconds the thing will decay and burst into a blaze of glory quarks & gluons.”

    Interested? Read Richard’s complete post here.

    Participants in Quantum Diaries:

    Fermilab

    Triumf

    US/LHC Blog


    CERN

    Brookhaven Lab

    KEK

     
  • richardmitnick 4:39 am on November 1, 2011 Permalink | Reply
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    Richard Ruiz at Quantum Diaries on Neutrinos 

    Neutrinos: The Great Asterisk of the Standard Model

    rr
    Richard Ruiz

    “For what it’s worth, neutrinos are weird. They are probably the strangest bits of matter in the Universe, and I do not mean in the quark sense either. Assuming that neutrinos are not actually trans-dimensional beings in search of a new home, there is probably no particle in Physics Past, Present, & Future that has bore more brunt of physicists’ creativity. On the other hand, as far as I know, there is no other particle that has solved as many problems in physics as neutrinos. The higgs boson is a good contender, but I still think neutrinos take the cake due to the fact that they have been around longer. Well, that and actually having been found to exist.

    I am sure by now you are wondering, “What are you talking about?”, and in all fairness, that is a very good question. In physics, neutrinos have a long history of being either the particle that broke the mold or the particle that saved physics. In doing so, neutrinos have developed this reputation for being the go-to particle for a new theory. In all fairness though, neutrinos are not doing themselves any favors if experiments keep finding contradictions with known laws of physics.

    For today’s post, I though I would share with you a few of the many flavors of neutrinos. It is also my secret goal to mention “neutrinos” so often in this post that it will be at the top of Google’s queue. The table of contents is just below with the full list today’s neutrino flavors. Believe it or not, there are still plenty of types omitted. I suppose I have to write a future post to include these.”

    Table of Contents

    [In the post, the following are links to each of Richard’s discussions of the various types of neutrinos]

    The First Neutrino: Pauli’s Neutron
    Chadwick’s Neutrino: The Neutron
    Fermi’s Neutrino: The Key to the Weak Nuclear Force
    Majorana’s Neutrino
    The Super Massive Neutrino
    The Extra, Extra Neutrino
    The Sterile Neutrino: Type I
    The Sterile Neutrino: Type II
    The Tachyon Neutrino

    i3
    An artist’s depiction

    See the full post here.

    Participants in Quantum Diaries:

    Fermilab

    Triumf

    US/LHC Blog


    CERN

    Brookhaven Lab

    KEK

     
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