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  • richardmitnick 2:34 pm on January 22, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Facebook, Google, ScienceSprings   

    A Note About the ScienceSprings Fan Page at Facebook 

    Some time ago, as an experiment, I started a Fan Page for ScienceSprings at Facebook. I assumed it would be a total flop. I mean, you know, it is hard enough to get people to be interested in Science; how far can one go in asking for their allegiance.

    A problem occurred through my own ignorance: since I “Liked” the page, entires there went through to my own Facebook page, and I assumed that they went to all of my “friends” at Facebook. But my daughter let me know that was not the case. She commented that she had not seen anything from me in quite a while. So, I put a note on the Fan Page that I needed to stop using it.

    Now, just today, a friend explained to my how it all works. So I started in the business of bringing the Fan Page up to date from about December 8, 2012, until the present.

    Well, the digirati at Facebook went nuts, told me I was going “too fast” and “blocked” me for two days. Too fast? What does “digital” mean? How can one go “too fast”?

    Anyway, now that I know how it works, I will be re-energizing the page for all of those interested.

    BTW, ScienceSprings is now also at Google+. You can search “Richard Mitnick”, or, I am told, you can actually search “ScienceSprings”. If you are using Google+, please search me up and add me to your circles.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:45 am on April 22, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Google, , ,   

    From the WCG Chat Room Forum: Google to Donate 1 Billion Core Hours to Research 

    i1

    1 billion core-hours of computational capacity for researchers
    April 07, 2011

    Posted by Dan Belov, Principal Engineer and David Konerding, Software Engineer

    We’re pleased to announce a new academic research grant program: Google Exacycle for Visiting Faculty. Through this program, we’ll award up to 10 qualified researchers with at least 100 million core-hours each, for a total of 1 billion core-hours. The program is focused on large-scale, CPU-bound batch computations in research areas such as biomedicine, energy, finance, entertainment, and agriculture, amongst others. For example, projects developing large-scale genomic search and alignment, massively scaled Monte Carlo simulations, and sky survey image analysis could be an ideal fit.

    Exacycle for Visiting Faculty expands upon our current efforts through University Relations to stimulate advances in science and engineering research, and awardees will participate through the Visiting Faculty Program. We invite full-time faculty members from universities worldwide to apply. All grantees, including those outside of the U.S., will work on-site at specific Google offices in the U.S. or abroad. The exact Google office location will be determined at the time of project selection.

    Technical Specifications and Requirements

    Proposals that are ideal for Google Exacycle include, but are not limited to, research projects like Folding@Home, Rosetta@Home, various [other] BOINC projects, and grid parameter sweeps. Other examples include large-scale genomic search and alignment, protein family modeling and sky survey image analysis.

    The best projects will have a very high number of independent work units, a high CPU to I/O ratio, and no inter-process communication (commonly described as Embarrassingly or Pleasantly Parallel). The higher the CPU to I/O rate, the better the match with the system. Programs must be developed in C/C++ and compiled via Native Client. Awardees will be able to consult an on-site engineering team.

    Preference will be given to projects that are fairly high-risk/high-reward with the potential to drastically transform the scientific landscape. Even projects that yield negative results can still provide public data that the community can continue to analyze. At completion of the project, we recommend, but do not require, that all the researcher’s data be made freely available to the academic community.

    We are excited to accept proposals starting today. The application deadline is 11:59 p.m. PST May 31, 2011. Applicants are encouraged to send in their proposals early as awards will be granted starting in June.

    More information and details on how to apply for a Google Exacycle for Visiting Faculty grant can be found on the Google Exacycle for Visiting Faculty website.

     
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