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  • richardmitnick 8:45 pm on August 5, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Fermilab muon g-2, , , ,   

    From SLAC: “Rebooted Muon Experiment Tests Detector Design at SLAC” 


    SLAC Lab

    August 5, 2014
    Last year, a monster magnet set out from Brookhaven National Lab on an epic, 35-day trek by land and sea to its new home at Fermilab, where it will serve as the heart of a search for evidence of new subatomic particles. Last month, with much less fanfare, researchers came to the End Station Test Beam (ESTB) facility at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to test the eyes and nerves of the same experiment: a cutting-edge design for a new detector.

    mag
    Muon g-2 magnet to be transported to Fermilab.

    The goal of the experiment, called Muon g-2 (pronounced gee-minus-two), is to precisely measure a property of muons by studying the way their spins precess, or wobble like a slowing top, in the grip of a powerful magnet. Researchers can track this spin by observing the muon’s decay into electrons, their lighter, longer-lived siblings.

    In the experiment’s original incarnation at Brookhaven, researchers discovered the spin rate is a tiny bit different from what theory says it should be – a difference that could indicate the influence of unknown virtual particles that pop into existence from the vacuum, affect the muons, and disappear once more.

    However, the researchers at Brookhaven weren’t able to measure the property precisely enough to know for sure. That prompted the relocation of the experiment – including the headline-grabbing move of the giant ring magnet – to Fermilab, with its more powerful muon beam.

    More Muons = More Data

    To take advantage of more muons, and thus more data, a team led by University of Washington physicist David Hertzog developed a new detector design for the experiment, a novel combination of lead-fluoride crystals and silicon photomultiplier chips that they hope will capture more information about the escaping electrons.

    Hertzog and his colleagues brought some of the crystals and silicon chips to SLAC’s ESTB facility, where electrons from the linear accelerator could stand in for the results of muon decays – but controlled and easily tracked muon decays, unlike what the detectors will face during the actual experiment.

    “These detectors will need to catch a tremendous number of muon decays, pinpointing their times and the energies of the electrons,” Hertzog said. “The electrons at ESTB can be delivered one at a time and with known energies, so we can see how the crystals and silicon photomultipliers respond.”

    The tests at ESTB have been much more low-key than the magnet’s 3200-mile trek, but Hertzog said his team can also look back at a successful venture.

    “This experiment has been really enjoyable,” Hertzog said. “We’ve got good data and our system seems to be working well.”

    See the full article here.

    SLAC Campus
    SLAC is a multi-program laboratory exploring frontier questions in photon science, astrophysics, particle physics and accelerator research. Located in Menlo Park, California, SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the DOE’s Office of Science.
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  • richardmitnick 3:57 pm on January 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Fermilab muon g-2, ,   

    From Fermilab: “Muon g-2 experiment earns CD-1 approval” 


    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014
    Andre Salles

    2013 was a big year for the Muon g-2 experiment.

    Over the summer, the 52-foot-wide electromagnet that forms the core of the experiment was transported from New York to Illinois in a flurry of publicity. Construction began on the building that will house that device and should be completed in the next couple of months.

    m2
    The Department of Energy recently gave the Muon g-2 experiment approval to proceed to the next phase of design. Photo: Cindy Arnold

    And in December, the Department of Energy granted Critical Decision 1 approval to the experiment, marking a major milestone and charting the path forward.

    Chris Polly, project manager for Muon g-2, said this approval process was the first time that DOE officials have reviewed the entire scope of the experiment, from the design to the cost to the timeline. In order to get to this stage, the collaboration developed a 500-page report, designing and costing every element of the project and then laying those elements out in a schedule consisting of 1,500 activities spanning four years.

    “It was an incredible amount of work that required everyone on the collaboration to really focus, thoroughly think through the whole experiment and document it all for the reviewers,” Polly said.

    The reviewers were pleased with the work and only had a few recommendations. Most notably, the committee suggested that the experiment team work with the DOE to develop an accelerated schedule.

    The review took place in September, and the intervening months were spent working out the timeline and funding profile. The work that had already been done to transport the electromagnet and begin construction of the MC-1 Building helped convince the reviewers that the team could keep to such a schedule.

    “CD-1 approval is a very important milestone for the experiment, and we appreciate all the strong support that we received from DOE and the laboratory management in getting us to this point,” said Lee Roberts, co-spokesperson for the experiment.

    The Muon g-2 collaboration received more good news this month as well: The omnibus budget bill signed into law on Jan. 17 includes funding to continue the design and begin construction of the experiment. (That funding is not explicitly spelled out in the bill but is covered.)

    2014 will be another big year with the reassembly of the storage ring in its new home, the development of detectors for the experiment and the start of construction for the muon source. And this summer the Muon g-2 team will undergo the next step in the approval process, an extensive CD-2 review.

    See the full article here.

    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.


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  • richardmitnick 9:24 am on July 26, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Fermilab muon g-2, , , , ,   

    From Symmetry: “Giant electromagnet arrives at Fermilab” 

    July 26, 2013
    Laura Dattaro

    The 50-foot-wide electromagnet for the Muon g-2 experiment has completed its five-week journey from New York to Illinois.

    rting
    Photo by Reidar Hahn, Fermilab

    For the last three nights, a big rig has traveled slowly down the roads of suburban Illinois bearing an American flag and the warning sign “Oversize Load.” The warning may have been an understatement. Its ‘load’ was a 50-foot, 17-ton electromagnet that, for the last month, has voyaged by land and by sea from Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island. Early this morning, it reached its final destination: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory outside of Chicago. The electromagnet arrived accompanied by an impressive entourage: a dozen state trooper cars and more than a handful of county sheriffs and local police, plus crews from a company called Roadsafe, which was tasked with removing roadside signs ahead of the convoy and righting them after it passed. It will make its final move across the laboratory site this afternoon. The logistics of the move have captured imaginations all along the way. But underneath the spectacle is important, potentially groundbreaking science. The electromagnet is part of what is known as the Muon g-2 experiment. Scientists on the Muon g-2 experiment study short-lived particles called muons, which wobble when placed in a magnetic field due to an internal conflict between some of their characteristics. In 2001, Brookhaven scientists used the ring to measure that wobble. Taking into consideration their current understanding of physics, scientists can predict what it should be like. If it turns out to be different than expected, it could indicate the presence of new physics.

    con
    Conveyance

    conveyance
    Conveyance

    In the first iteration of this experiment, Brookhaven physicists found hints that the wobble was off. Relocating the experiment to Fermilab will allow it to run in a more intense particle beam (for less money than it would cost to build the experiment anew), giving a more precise answer. ‘We’ve been trying for years to really determine whether we’ve discovered something new and exciting,’ says Muon g-2 Spokesperson Lee Roberts, who began working on the experiment in 1984. ‘We’re all excited to see the answer. It’s exciting for me personally, and it’s exciting for science.’ To relocate the magnet, the Muon g-2 team worked for over a year with Emmert International, a company that subsists on moving big, unwieldy objects, to plan the journey, which involved constructing a bright red fixture to hold the ring in place (prompting many observers along the way to compare it to a UFO). The ring is an exquisitely sensitive device; it cannot be bent or twisted by more than a few millimeters. ‘This is one of the widest, most fragile, dimensionally unusual, temperamental projects we’ve done,’ says Terry Emmert, owner of Emmert International. ‘It’s amazing to see it all come together.’

    The ring will complete its cross-country trip later today, but its second chance at searching for new physics has just begun.”

    See the full article here.

    Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.



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  • richardmitnick 6:52 am on January 11, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Fermilab muon g-2, , ,   

    From Symmetry: “Midwest muon experiments carry on East Coast legacy” 

    As researchers across the United States—and around the world—plan two new supersymmetry-hunting experiments to be located at Fermilab, symmetry writer Joseph Piergrossi sat down with collaborators from Boston University to learn more about the projects’ goals and history.

    jp
    Joseph Piergrossi, General Science Writer, Journalist and Educator

    January 10, 2013
    Joseph Piergrossi

    This spring, scientists at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory [Fermilab] will break ground on the buildings for a Muon Campus. The two initial experiments proposed for the campus draw on three decades of technological advances to turn muons into supersensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model

    Standard Model
    Standard Model (w/Higgs)

    “With the Muon g-2 experiment, scientists aim to discover signs of subatomic particles and forces that have eluded detection by other experiments. It will be more sensitive to virtual or hidden particles and forces than any previous experiment of its kind. The Mu2e experiment will test a fundamental symmetry of the quantum world.

    Muon g-2 (pronounced g minus two), the first experiment to be installed in the new Muon Campus at Fermilab, has its roots in a muon experiment of the same name that ran from 1997 to 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. ‘The muon is very sensitive to the hidden presence of new physics,’ says Lee Roberts, professor of physics at Boston University and co-spokesperson for the Muon g-2 experiment.

    The Brookhaven Muon g-2 experiment had its inception in 1982, when Yale physicist Vernon Hughes suggested an experiment to measure the magnetic dipole moment of the muon 20 times better than previous experiments run at CERN in the 1970s. He and Roberts were the co-spokespeople for the Brookhaven project and headed the design of the experiment, which eventually involved scientists from 14 institutions in five countries.

    Boston University has had a major stake in the Muon g-2 experiments at Brookhaven and now at Fermilab. In the early 1990s, the university provided the facilities to construct many important components of the muon ring. It was one of a half dozen institutions that ‘played a crucial role’ in the experiment, says Brookhaven’s Bill Morse, former resident spokesperson for the Muon g-2 project.

    m2bnl
    The Muon g-2 Experiment at BNL

    mc
    The new campus at Fermilab

    See the full article here.

    Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.


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  • richardmitnick 6:15 pm on September 19, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Fermilab muon g-2   

    From Fermilab: “Second muon experiment receives Mission Need approval from DOE” 


    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012
    Kurt Riesselmann

    Fermilab’s plans for creating a Muon Campus with top-notch Intensity Frontier experiments have received a big boost. The Department of Energy has granted Mission Need approval to the Muon g-2 project, one of two experiments proposed for the new Muon Campus. The other proposed experiment, Mu2e, is a step ahead and already received the next level of DOE approval, known as Critical Decision 1.

    image
    Fermilab is reconfiguring the Debuncher ring, part of the former Antiproton Source, to create high-intensity muon beams for the Muon g-2 experiment. Earlier this year, a team of scientists successfully circulated the first muons in the Debuncher. Photo: Reidar Hahn

    image2
    This rendering shows the location of the proposed Muon Campus at Fermilab. The arrow points to the proposed site of the planned Muon g-2 experiment. Click to enlarge. Image: Muon Department/FESS

    ‘We now are officially on DOE’s roadmap,” said Lee Roberts, professor at Boston University and co-spokesperson for the roughly 100 scientists collaborating on the Muon g-2 (pronounced gee minus two) experiment. “This should make it easier to increase the size of our collaboration and foster international participation. Potential collaborators supported by the National Science Foundation or foreign funding agencies will be happy to see that we now have DOE’s official Mission Need approval.'”

    See the full article here.

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.


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