Tagged: Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 3:19 pm on May 1, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), , , ,   

    From LC Newsline: “From UK News from CERN: Speaking up for CLIC” 

    Linear Collider Collaboration header
    Linear Collider Collaboration

    1 May 2014
    Stephanie Hills, STFC’s UK Communications and Innovation Officer

    The CLIC accelerator collaboration has elected a new spokesperson. Phil Burrows of the University of Oxford succeeds Roberto Corsini of CERN.

    pb
    Phil Burrows is the new CLIC accelerator spokesman. Image: Jesus College, Oxford

    Over the next three years, Burrows will be engaging with the institutes that are members of CLIC and helping to ensure that CLIC’s R&D programme pushes ahead during the critical phase ahead of the next update of the European strategy for particle physics. Corsini will continue his technical leadership of CLIC/CTF3.

    Burrows, who is an expert on fast-feedback and feed-forward beam correction systems (studied at KEK’s ATF2 and CERN’s CTF3 test facilities for future linear colliders) and on the machine-detector interface, is the first non-CERN CLIC accelerator spokesman. “I hope to cultivate the collaboration spirit and maximise opportunities for the international CLIC accelerator collaboration,” he says. The CTF3 test facility will probably stop operating in its current mode within the next couple of years, so changes are ahead for CLIC. “There are several promising avenues to explore, including exploring opportunities for novel applications of CLIC technologies.”

    The most recent European strategy for particle physics was published in 2013. Recognising the international collaborations that will be needed to make scientific advances, it sets out the future priorities for European particle physics research. The strategy is due to be updated in 2018, and that’s likely to be the timescale for decisions on the future direction for CLIC. With other potential successors to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) on the table, Burrows says there will be tough decisions to be made about the best choice for the next big particle physics machine in Europe. “Any future proposed project would be expensive to build. We might be able to afford one in Europe, but definitely not two or more.”

    “CLIC remains the only viable technology today that could take us to multi-TeV centre of mass electron-positron collisions,” he says. “But we need more LHC results to assess whether it is the right machine to take us into new areas of physics research. LHC results over the next few years of running at higher energy and luminosity will be key to determining the way forward.”

    Using the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3), the key concepts of CLIC have already been tested and proved. Probably the most innovative element of the CLIC design is that it has two beams – a drive beam and a main beam. “We’ve demonstrated that it is possible to transfer energy from the drive beam and feed it to the main beam,” says Burrows. “Now we need to work on more of the technical implementation and system optimization, not least how to mass produce the components that we need – essential for keeping the cost of the project as low as possible.”

    CLIC collider
    CLIC

    For the next few years, the focus is definitely on CLIC R&D, but Phil will undoubtedly have more than half an eye on results coming out of the LHC when it starts operating again in 2015.

    See the full article here.

    The Linear Collider Collaboration is an organisation that brings the two most likely candidates, the Compact Linear Collider Study (CLIC) and the International Liner Collider (ILC), together under one roof. Headed by former LHC Project Manager Lyn Evans, it strives to coordinate the research and development work that is being done for accelerators and detectors around the world and to take the project linear collider to the next step: a decision that it will be built, and where.

    Some 2000 scientists – particle physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers – are involved in the ILC or in CLIC, and often in both projects. They work on state-of-the-art detector technologies, new acceleration techniques, the civil engineering aspect of building a straight tunnel of at least 30 kilometres in length, a reliable cost estimate and many more aspects that projects of this scale require. The Linear Collider Collaboration ensures that synergies between the two friendly competitors are used to the maximum.

    Linear Collider Colaboration Banner


    ScienceSprings is powered by MAINGEAR computers

     
  • richardmitnick 11:30 am on August 22, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), , , , ,   

    From LC Collaboration: “Common ground in ILC and CLIC detector concepts” 

    Linear Collider Colaboration Banner

    22 August 2013
    Daisy Yuhas

    “The Compact Linear Collider and International Linear Collider will accelerate particles and create collisions in different ways. Nonetheless, the detector concepts under development share many commonalities.

    LCTopCLICBottom
    ILC Top, CLIC Bottom

    CERN physicist Dominik Dannheim explains that CLIC detector plans are adaptations of the ILC detector designs with a few select modifications. ‘When we started several years ago, we did not want to reinvent the wheel,’ says Dannheim. The approved ILC detector concepts served as an excellent starting point for our designs.’

    Essential differences

    Both CLIC and ILC scientists foresee general-purpose detectors that make measurements with exquisite precision. These colliders, however, have very different operating parameters, which will have important consequences for the various detector components. The ILC’s collision energy is set at 500 GeV (with option to upgrade to 1 TeV), while CLIC will collide at up to 3 TeV. And the bunch structure is very different, too. The main difference is in the timing of the collisions. At the ILC electrons and positrons collide in bunch crossings spread out over bunch trains of almost a millisecond. At CLIC these bunch trains last for only 156 nanoseconds. So CLIC detectors will have a tougher job disentangling the rare physics events from the collision background.

    The higher energy will give CLIC a greater physics reach, but will also create more unwanted background events with less time to disentangle background from more interesting phenomena. “Simulations have shown that a time resolution at the nanosecond level is needed for most sub-detectors at CLIC,” says Dannheim. “In this respect they will be similar to the ones currently in operation at the LHC, yet aiming for much higher granularity and measurement precision.”

    Vertex detector

    The detector component closest to the interaction point, where collisions occur, is the vertex detector. ILC concepts place a paper-thin pixel detector near the interaction point to improve the resolution of short-lived particles created in collisions.

    The harsher background conditions at CLIC required a redesign of the inner detectors, which included moving the vertex detector further away from the interaction point. CLIC scientists are developing a different type of pixel detector for this region, where thin sensors are coupled to dedicated ultra-fast low-power readout chips (called CLICpix). This technology will help limit the number of overlapping background particles that inevitably blur the result. First prototypes of the newly developed CLICpix readout chip and of 50-μm-thin sensors have recently been produced, marking important milestones for the CLIC vertex detector project. The ultra-thin sensors will be under scrutiny in the DESY test beam telescope in the next two weeks.”

    See the full article here.

    What is the Linear Collider Collaboration?

    While the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is producing exciting results like the discovery of a new particle that could be the Higgs boson, scientists around the world are already planning the next big collider to take the discoveries to the next level. Even though there is no decision yet which collider will be built or where, there is consensus in the scientific community that the results from the LHC will have to be complemented by a collider that can study the discoveries in greater detail by producing different kinds of collisions.

    The Linear Collider Collaboration is an organisation that brings the two most likely candidates, the Compact Linear Collider Study (CLIC) and the International Liner Collider (ILC), together under one roof. Headed by former LHC Project Manager Lyn Evans, it strives to coordinate the research and development work that is being done for accelerators and detectors around the world and to take the project linear collider to the next step: a decision that it will be built, and where.

    Some 2000 scientists — particle physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers — are involved in the ILC or in CLIC, and often in both projects. They work on state-of-the-art detector technologies, new acceleration techniques, the civil engineering aspect of building a straight tunnel of at least 30 kilometres in length, a reliable cost estimate and many more aspects that projects of this scale require. The Linear Collider Collaboration ensures that synergies between the two friendly competitors are used to the maximum.


    ScienceSprings is powered by MAINGEAR computers

     
  • richardmitnick 2:26 pm on March 21, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), , , ,   

    From LC Newsline: “Forming a united front of the LC physics and detector community” 

    Linear Collider Collaboration header

    Director’s Corner

    21 March 2013
    Hitoshi Yamamoto

    The Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC) officially started at the Vancouver Linear Collider Board (LCB) meeting in February 2013, and the new organisation is slowly taking shape. I was appointed Associate Director for the Physics & Detector portion of the new structure. LCC director Lyn Evans told us that he thought the task assigned to this post would be the most difficult one.

    meeting
    The global ILC and CLIC communities, including Physics and Detectors, met last time in Arlington, US, for the LCWS12 workshop in October 2012. Image: University of Texas Arlington.

    1. Physics case

    As the LHC keeps on producing impressing physics output, the physics case for an LC needs to be continuously updated. There is also a clear hope that further LHC running at full energy might open the doors to results beyond the Standard Model, providing significant additional opportunities within the energy range of linear colliders. The physics capabilities of the ILC and those of the CLIC option with a centre-of-mass energy below 1 TeV are very similar, and both communities can and should join their forces together for this goal.

    2. Detector R&D

    As we move from conceptual to engineering design of the LC detectors, unfinished necessary detector R&D should be completed. Here again, there is a large area of efforts common to both CLIC and ILC, and they have to be coordinated in a more formal and visible way. In addition, the detector R&D for a linear collider has been raising the standards of the high-energy physics detector technologies in general and we should make sure that it will continue to do so. In coordinating such efforts, we should make sure that voices of detector R&D groups, including small groups, are heard effectively by the management.

    See the full article here.

    ilc
    CILC

    ilc
    ILC

    The Linear Collider Collaboration is an organisation that brings the two most likely candidates, the Compact Linear Collider Study (CLIC) and the International Liner Collider (ILC), together under one roof. Headed by former LHC Project Manager Lyn Evans, it strives to coordinate the research and development work that is being done for accelerators and detectors around the world and to take the project linear collider to the next step: a decision that it will be built, and where.

    Some 2000 scientists – particle physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers – are involved in the ILC or in CLIC, and often in both projects. They work on state-of-the-art detector technologies, new acceleration techniques, the civil engineering aspect of building a straight tunnel of at least 30 kilometres in length, a reliable cost estimate and many more aspects that projects of this scale require. The Linear Collider Collaboration ensures that synergies between the two friendly competitors are used to the maximum.

    Linear Collider Colaboration Banner


    ScienceSprings is powered by MAINGEAR computers

     
  • richardmitnick 7:33 am on November 21, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), , , , ,   

    From Symmetry- “A bouquet of options: Higgs factory ideas bloom” 

    November 20, 2012
    Signe Brewster

    Now that a Higgs-like boson has been discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, proposals to build colliders that churn out the new particle are gathering momentum.

    higgs
    One possible signature of a Higgs boson from a simulated collision between two protons. It decays almost immediately into two jets of hadrons and two electrons, visible as lines.

    “If you hurl two oranges together at close to the speed of light, there’s going to be a lot of pulp. But, somewhere in the gooey mess will be the rare splinters left over from two seeds colliding.The Large Hadron Collider at CERN works in a similar way. Protons, each made of quarks and gluons, collide and produce other particles. Roughly once every 5 billion proton collisions, everything aligns and a Higgs-like boson pops out.

    Now that a boson with Higgs-like qualities has been found, physicists are calling for something more precise: a Higgs factory that would collide elementary particles to produce Higgs bosons in droves without all the distracting pulp. By colliding particles that don’t break down into composite parts as they produce Higgs-like particles, a Higgs factory could allow a more precise view of the new boson.

    Now that the Higgs-like particle is known to have a mass of about 125 billion electronvolts, scientists know that it is within reach of a variety of proposed colliders, both small and large. As a result, proposals for Higgs factories have emerged for colliders that smash electrons with positrons, muons with muons, or photons with photons.

    Linear electron–positron colliders are among the largest and most expensive Higgs factories because they are designed to be versatile. Two proposed machines, known as the International Linear Collider and the Compact Linear Collider, would be 3.4 miles and 1.35 miles long respectively. It would cost at least $5 billion to build the ILC or CLIC…

    lic
    A view of the two beam lines in the CLIC experimental hall.

    Electron–positron colliders can also be circular. The LHC tunnel was originally built for the Large Electron–Positron collider, which produced the first precise measurements of the W and Z bosons in the 1980s. One proposal, called LEP3, would build a Higgs factory in the LHC tunnel, most likely after the LHC shuts down. It would cut costs by using existing infrastructure, such as some of the particle detectors and the cryogenics system.”

    lep
    LEP, preceded the LHC at CERN

    See the full article here. There is much more important material here.

    Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.

     
  • richardmitnick 3:10 pm on April 11, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), , , ,   

    From Symmetry/Breaking: “Two proposed linear collider programs to be joined under new governance” 

    Leah Hesla
    April 11, 2012

    “The world’s two most mature proposals for a collider complementary to the Large Hadron Collider are joining collaborative forces.

    The two proposed electron-positron collider projects, the Compact Linear Collider Study and the International Linear Collider, have traditionally been viewed as casual rivals–both in the running to be built as the future complement to CERN’s proton-smashing machine, the LHC.

    Now CLIC and the ILC are joining organizational forces under the linear collider umbrella. The new organizational structure, announced in February by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) Chair Pier Oddone [Director of Fermilab], is still in its very early stages, but those involved hope to finalize the governance framework by July, implementing the new plan gradually over the following year. The plan is for ICFA, which currently oversees the ILC Global Design Effort, to establish a Linear Collider Board, which would in turn govern CLIC, the ILC, and a third program that focuses on detector research for both machines.

    The CLIC and the ILC programs are joining organizational forces within the framework of the International Committee for Future Accelerators. ICFA plans to establish a Linear Collider Board.

    ‘As we move into the next phase in the evolution of linear colliders it is important to bring the ILC and CLIC efforts under unified leadership,’ Oddone said.”

    Symmetrybreaking is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication

     
  • richardmitnick 1:22 pm on October 27, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Compact Linear Collider (CLIC),   

    From CERN Bulletin via ILC Newsline: “Detectors on the drawing board” 

    Katarina Anthony
    Monday 24 October 2011

    ” ‘While the LHC experiments remain the pinnacle of detector technology, you may be surprised to realise that the design and expertise behind them is well over 10 years old,’ says Lucie Linssen, CERN’s Linear Collider Detector (LCD) project manager whose group is pushing the envelope of detector design. “The next generation of detectors will have to surpass the achievements of the LHC experiments. It’s not an easy task but, by observing detectors currently in operation and exploiting a decade’s worth of technological advancements, we’ve made meaningful progress.”

    The LCD team is currently working on detectors for the CLIC experiment. “Electron-positron colliders like CLIC demand detectors with significantly more precision than those at the LHC,” explains Lucie. “We’ve studied a variety of techniques to cope with this precision and other CLIC-specific issues. Many of these were pioneered for earlier linear colliders, but have since been adapted to fit CLIC’s unique parameters.” The team’s work has culminated in two detector designs, published in the CLIC Conceptual Design Report.

    i1
    A simulated event display in one of the new generation detectors.

    There is a lot of interesting information in this post. See the full article here. This article at ILC newsline is a bit of a surprise to me, as the CLIC is in direct competition with the ILC itself for future funding ans use.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:17 pm on October 13, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), , , , ,   

    From ilc newsline: “CERN balances linear collider studies” 

    [What did that guy in L.A., Rodney King, say? “Can’t we all get along?”]

    “The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study , have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In at least nominal support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.

    Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspects of ILC-related studies through combined working groups, site studies and detector and physics activities.

    i1
    The second conference held jointly by ILC and CLIC collaborations was held this year in Granada, Spain.

    See the full article here.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 377 other followers

%d bloggers like this: