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  • richardmitnick 3:29 pm on October 1, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From FNAL- “Going larger than the Large Hadron Collider: first steps toward a future machine” 


    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
    Sanjay Padhi, Next Steps in the Energy Frontier workshop co-leader, University of California, San Diego Distinguished LPC Researcher

    In 2012, when scientists at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider discovered the Higgs boson, the machine was colliding particles at an energy of 8 teraelectronvolts, or 8 TeV. Just imagine what a 100-TeV collider could uncover.

    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel
    CERN LHC particles
    CERN LHC

    That’s what more than 80 scientists in the field of particle physics discussed at a workshop hosted by the LHC Physics Center at Fermilab from Aug. 25-28. Such a collider could unlock profound mysteries of the modern era of physics that remain unanswered. The world’s leading experts in accelerators,detectors and particle physics theory gathered to outline how the community could take the “Next Steps in the Energy Frontier” to address these questions.

    The global community has put forward two possible initiatives for a 100-TeV hadron collider: one based in Beijing, called the Super Proton Proton Collider, and one based at CERN in Geneva, the Future Circular Collider. If built, such a collider would be the largest ever, capable of probing nature at the shortest possible distance ever explored, 10-18 centimeters.

    “No matter what the next few years of experiments — in the lab, underground and in space — will unveil, the direct exploration of the shortest possible distances remains the principal probe of the fundamental laws of nature,” said CERN scientist Michelangelo Mangano. “Preparing for the next step in this endeavor is a duty, and it’s fun!”

    It would also be the first particle accelerator to have decisive coverage of exploring a weakly interacting massive particle [WIMP] dark matter candidate. It would also shed light on the mass scale related to the widely discussed naturalness aspects of nature, the asymmetry between matter and antimatter observed in our universe, rare phenomena associated with Higgs boson productions, and symmetry between matter and forces, among other unresolved matters.

    The workshop provided a platform where leaders from Beijing and CERN discussed in detail for the first time in the United States the issues attendant in realizing the technology required by such a high-energy collider: strong high-field superconducting magnets, including those that can operate at higher temperatures; precise, fast, high-resolution, radiation-hard silicon detectors only 10 to 30 microns thick; imaging energy-measuring calorimeters; next-generation computing frameworks for trigger systems and analyses and other advancements.

    “It was a very special experience to be on the ‘ground floor’ of such a grand, ambitious and worthwhile collective endeavor. The array of theorists and experimentalists at the workshop included the world’s best,” said Raman Sundrum from the University of Maryland.

    As with any innovation, these technological advancements will have an impact beyond fundamental research, benefiting industrial fields in R&D and cost. Indeed, a project of this magnitude will require synergies between various initiatives and provide international collaboration opportunities not only within the scientific communities, but also with industry. Members of the particle physics community plan to continue efforts toward a 100-TeV hadron collider, with the United States playing a central role.

    “This workshop opens a vision for the future of the study of fundamental interactions that points beyond the coming decade, continuing to follow our passion for science,” said workshop co-organizer Meenakshi Narain of Brown University.

    See the full article here.

    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.

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  • richardmitnick 7:33 pm on September 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From BBC: “‘Artificial retina’ could detect sub-atomic particles” 

    BBC

    18 September 2014
    Melissa Hogenboom

    The human eye has inspired physicists to create a processor that can analyse sub-atomic particle collisions 400 times faster than currently possible.

    In these collisions, protons – ordinary matter – are smashed together at close to light speeds.

    pro
    The quark structure of the proton. The color assignment of individual quarks is arbitrary, but all three colors must be present. Forces between quarks are mediated by gluons

    These powerful smash-ups could yield new particles and help scientists understand matter’s mirror, antimatter.

    anti
    The quark structure of the antiproton

    The experimental processor could speed up the analysis of data from the collisions.

    Published in the pre-print arXiv server, the algorithm has been proposed for possible use in Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments at Cern in 2020. It could also be useful in any field where fast, efficient pattern recognition capabilities are needed.

    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel
    LHC

    The processor works in a similar way to the retina’s incredible ability to recognise patterns extremely quickly.
    Snapshots in time

    That is, individual neurons in our retinas are specialised to respond to particular shapes or orientations, which they do automatically before our brain is even consciously aware of what we are processing.

    pd
    Image of particle decay LHC machines produce 40 million collisions per second

    Cern physicist Diego Tonelli, one of a team of collaborators of the work, explained that the “artificial retina” detects a snapshot of the trajectory of each collision which is then immediately analysed.

    These snapshots are then mapped into an algorithm that can run on a computer, automatically scanning and analysing the charged particle trajectories, or tracks. Exposing the detector to future collisions will then allow teams sift out the interesting events.

    Data crunching

    Speed is of the essence here. There are roughly 40 million collisions per second and each can result in hundreds of charged particles.

    The scientists then have to plough through an incredible amount of data. It’s spotting the deviations from the norm that may give hints of new physics.

    lhcb
    LHCb experiment
    The LHC will be switched on again in early 2015

    An algorithm like this could therefore provide a useful way of crunching through this vast amount of data, in real time.

    “It’s 400 times faster than anything existing or foreseen for high energy physics applications. If implemented in a real experiment it will allow us to collect more interesting data more quickly,” Dr Tonelli told the BBC.

    Flavour physics

    The LHC has been switched off since February 2013 but is due to begin its hunt for new physics in 2015 when the giant machine will once again begin smashing together protons.

    As this happens, they break down and free up a huge amounts of energy that forms many neutral and charged particles. It’s the trajectories of the charged ones that can be observed.

    col
    Particle collisions
    A collision in the Large Hadron Collider creates tracks of charged particles

    The new algorithm is not aimed at the type of physics used to find the famous Higgs boson, instead it’s intended to be used for “flavour physics” which deals with the interaction of the basic components of matter, the quarks.

    Commenting on the work, Tara Shears a Cern particle physicist from the University of Liverpool, said it could be extremely useful to automatically “give us most information about what we want to study – Higgs, dark matter, antimatter and so on. The artificial retina algorithm looks like it does this brilliantly”.

    “When our detectors take these snapshots of the collisions – to us that’s like the picture that your eye sees and when your brain is scanning that picture and making sense of it, well we try and codify those rules into an algorithm that we run on computers that do the job for us automatically,” Prof Shears told the BBC’s Inside Science programme.

    “When the LHC continues… we will start to operate with a more intense beam of protons getting a much higher data rate, and then this problem of sifting out what you really want to study becomes really really pressing,” she added.

    “This artificial retinal algorithm is one of the latest steps in our mission to [understand the Universe], and it’s really good, it does the job vast banks of computers normally do.”

    The algorithm has been developed with the 2020 upgrade of the LHC in mind, which will have even more powerful collisions.

    See the full article here.

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  • richardmitnick 7:04 pm on September 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From physicsworld: “A day in the life of CERN’s director-general” 

    physicsworld
    physicsworld.com

    Sep 16, 2014
    By Rolf-Dieter Heuer, Geneva

    There is no such thing as a typical day in the life of a CERN director-general (DG), certainly not this one in any case. In my experience, each incumbent has carved out a slightly different role for themself, shaped by the laboratory’s priorities and activities at the time of their mandate. For me, every day goes beyond science, management and administration, and I am particularly fortunate to have been DG through a remarkable period that has seen not only the successful launch of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and confirmation of the Brout–Englert–Higgs mechanism, but also an opening of CERN to the world – an area that I have pursued with particular vigour.

    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel
    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC particles
    LHC at CERN

    dg
    All in a day’s work. (Courtesy: CERN)

    As I regularly joke, we have changed the “E” of CERN from “Europe” to “Everywhere”, and that has meant a lot of travel for the CERN DG, as we hold discussions with prospective new members of the CERN family. And when the CERN Council opened up membership to countries from beyond the European region in 2010, it seemed to me that we should also be extending our contacts in other directions as well.

    For that reason, I have taken up the CERN DG’s standing invitation to attend the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in Davos, where I strive to get science further up the agenda, and I have actively pursued a policy of engagement with other international organizations. CERN’s host city is home to a concentration of international organizations like nowhere else on Earth, and our missions overlap in areas ranging from technology to standards to intellectual property. A typical day might see me paying a visit to the United Nations Office in Geneva, or receiving a visit from the ambassador of an existing or prospective CERN member state.

    But the role goes beyond one of diplomacy. The CERN DG has, first and foremost, a lab to run. Although I have a strong team of directors and department leaders to help me, issues ranging from liaison between experiments to delicate issues in human resources or dealings with officials from our two host states – France and Switzerland – find their way to my door. Each year is punctuated by fixed points for the meetings of advisory and governance bodies, for directorate meetings and presentations to personnel.

    With all this going on, there is no typical day, so I’ll describe the most untypical of all during my term of office: Wednesday 4 July 2012.

    I’d been told that people were so keen to have a seat in CERN’s main auditorium for that day’s Higgs-update seminar that some were prepared to camp out all night to secure their place, so I came in early to see if it were true. I expected to see a few hardy souls at 7 a.m., but not the long snaking queue, headed up by sleeping bags, that started outside the doors of the auditorium, carried on all the way along corridors and ended up down the stairs in main entrance lobby. The atmosphere was reserved, yet excited, with an air of expectation about it. I went up to my office to prepare my notes and gather my thoughts.

    We had not known until the last minute whether or not we would be announcing a discovery or just another step on the way. Yet the world was expectant. Peter Higgs and François Englert were at CERN, as were Gerry Guralnik and Carl Hagen – two of the three authors of the other pioneering paper from the 1960s that had anticipated what we now know as the Brout–Englert–Higgs mechanism. Robert Brout, unfortunately, did not live to see the confirmation of his ideas, while Tom Kibble – Guralnik and Hagen’s co-author – was at a parallel event in London. The press were also there in force, and the CERN Council’s meeting room was converted into a media centre for the day.

    Although just a few days earlier I didn’t know what message I’d be bringing to the expectant crowd, at 7 a.m. that day I had what I needed to announce a discovery. Over the preceding weeks and days, Fabiola Gianotti and Joe Incandela had each kept me up to date with the status of the analyses from the ATLAS and CMS experiments of which they were the spokespersons, and by the Friday before the seminar, I’d seen enough. Although by that time neither experiment was sure they’d be able to announce the required 5σ significance needed to claim discovery, I’d seen both experiment’s results, and that was enough for me to know that taken together the 5σ would be reached.

    CERN ATLAS New
    ATLAS

    CERN CMS New
    CMS

    rdh
    Wednesday 4 July 2012 was an extraordinary day. (Courtesy: CERN)

    By the time I went back down to the auditorium, the doors had been opened and people had taken their seats, yet the crowd outside seemed even bigger than before. Inside the room, the mood was an unusual mixture of party and scientific seminar. We were being watched around the world: nearly half a million people tuned in to the webcast, I’m told, and we had a room full of physicists in Melbourne assembled there on the eve of that year’s major particle-physics conference, beamed to a screen above my head. It culminated in joyous scenes as the experiments announced their results: as it turned out, they didn’t need me to announce the discovery. Peter Higgs, sitting next to François Englert whom he’d met for the first time that day, had a smile on his face that said it all.

    The seminar was over, but for me the day was just beginning. Fabiola, Joe and I were ushered into the media centre for a press conference, in which the theorists were given a front-row seat. Once the media scrum has subsided and Peter Higgs had graciously led the theorists in saying that this was a day for the experiments and there’d be time to talk to him later, the three of us recounted the story all over again before spending the day giving interview after interview.

    Eventually, the cameras stopped clicking, the microphones were put back in their bags, and it was time to head off for the airport to catch my flight to Melbourne for the conference. It was only when I got on the plane and ordered a glass of champagne that the enormity of the day sunk in. It had been an incredible day, full of emotion, leaving me happy not only with the result, but also with that fact that it had so strongly captured the world’s imagination.

    A day in the life of the CERN DG? Always challenging, sometimes exhausting, frequently frustrating but always rewarding. And although 4 July 2012 may not have been a typical day, it is for me one of the most memorable of all.

    See the full article here.

    PhysicsWorld is a publication of the Institute of Physics. The Institute of Physics is a leading scientific society. We are a charitable organisation with a worldwide membership of more than 50,000, working together to advance physics education, research and application.

    We engage with policymakers and the general public to develop awareness and understanding of the value of physics and, through IOP Publishing, we are world leaders in professional scientific communications.
    IOP Institute of Physics

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  • richardmitnick 11:09 am on September 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From The Daily Galaxy: “”Hidden Supersymmetry?” –Debate Over a New Physics Intensifies (The Weekend Feature)” 

    Daily Galaxy
    The Daily Galaxy

    Theoretical physicists have theorized a possible solution to a longstanding mystery bolstered by the recent discovery of the Higgs boson – a way to preserve the theory of supersymmetry. It was a breakthrough with profound implications for the world as we know it: the Higgs boson, the elementary particle that gives all other particles their mass, discovered at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. But, for many scientists, it’s only the beginning. When the LHC fires up again in 2015 at its highest-ever collision energy, theorists will be watching with intense interest.
    Earlier this year in Physical Review Letters, Csaba Csaki, Cornell professor of physics, and colleagues theorized a possible solution to a longstanding mystery bolstered by the recent discovery of the Higgs – a way to preserve the theory of supersymmetry, a popular, but experimentally unproven, extension of the Standard Model of particle physics.

    sm
    The Standard Model of elementary particles, with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.

    higgs
    Depiction of Higgs Boson

    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel
    CERN LHC particles
    LHC

    image

    Supersymmetry could help explain the unusual properties of the Higgs boson, why the strong and weak interactions of subatomic particles appear to be so different, as well as the origin of dark matter, which makes up a quarter of the universe.

    The Standard Model deals with three of nature’s fundamental forces: strong, weak and electromagnetic, which govern the relationships between all the known subatomic particles. Supersymmetry extends the Standard Model by introducing new particles, called “superpartners”; every observed particle would have a corresponding superpartner, with similar properties to those of the observed particles, except heavier and with different spin values.

    Some scientists think supersymmetry ought to be abandoned after the LHC failed to detect any of these superpartners; some of them, like the top quark’s superpartner, the “stop,” is predicted to be so light that the LHC should already have seen it.

    In their paper, Csaki and colleagues counter that the particles may be hidden by the noise of other particles formed during the LHC’s unprecedented energy of proton-proton collisions.

    Their idea has to do with a concept called R-parity. All observed particles are assumed to have positive R-parity, while the unobserved superpartners would be negative, implying that the superpartners cannot decay to ordinary particles exclusively.

    Searching for the superpartners at the LHC, Csaki explained, has largely operated under the assumption that this R-parity is always exactly conserved. Csaki and colleagues pose a scenario in which R-parity is violated, and would result in a series of interactions giving rise to particle decays that would be nearly impossible to detect by the LHC’s current parameters.

    “The upshot is that there are ways to hide supersymmetry at the LHC,” Csaki said. “If the signal isn’t very different from the background, it’s very hard to find them. That’s the problem.”

    The LHC, when back online next year, is scheduled to run at a collision energy of 14 TeV (teraelectron volts) – about double the energy of previous runs. It could lead to ultimate proof of the theory of supersymmetry, which Csaki deems the “most beautiful” of the Standard Model extensions offered today – but science must make room for all possibilities.

    “It’s very possible that supersymmetry is not the right theory, and that’s OK,” he said. “The important thing is to understand the way science works, to try and make the best guesses you can, and the experimentalists go and check it. … We have to make sure we are exploring every corner, and we shouldn’t leave some potentially reasonable theory out where things could be hiding.”

    The image at the top of the page is an artist’s simulation of dark matter halo around the Milky Way galaxy.’s own backyard. Credit: NASA, ESA, and T. Brown and J. Tumlinson (STScI)

    See the full article here.

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  • richardmitnick 10:50 am on September 16, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From New Scientist: “Curtain closing on Higgs boson photon soap opera” 

    NewScientist

    New Scientist

    15 September 2014
    Michael Slezak

    It was the daytime soap opera of particle physics. But the final episode of the first season ends in an anticlimax. The Higgs boson‘s decay into pairs of photons – the strongest yet most confusing clue to the particle’s existence – is looking utterly normal after all.

    Experiments don’t detect the Higgs boson directly – instead, its existence is inferred by looking at the particles left behind when it decays. One way it made itself known at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, Switzerland, two years ago was by decaying into pairs of photons. Right at the start, there were so many photons that physicists considered it a “deviant decay” – and a possible window into new laws of physics, which could help explain the mysteries of dark energy and the like.

    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel
    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC particles
    LHC at CERN

    Even as other kinks in the data got ironed out, the excess of photons remained. At the time, physicists speculated that it could be due to a mysterious second Higgs boson being created, or maybe the supersymmetric partner of the top quark.

    Supersymmetry standard model
    Standard Model showing Supersymmetric Particles

    Identity crisis

    If unheard of particles and physical laws weren’t dramatic enough, six months later, the decay into photons was giving the Higgs an identity crisis. When physicists measured the Higgs mass by observing it decaying into another type of particle, called a Z boson, it appeared lighter than when doing a similar calculation using the decay into photons. “The results are barely consistent,” Albert de Roeck, one of the key Higgs hunters at CERN’s CMS experiment, said at the time.

    But over the past year, physicists at CERN have found that the Higgs boson is acting exactly as the incomplete standard model of particle physics predicts, leaving us with no clues about how to extend it.

    Now, in an anticlimactic summary on the two photon decay, both big experiments at the LHC have posted results showing the photons are, after all the fuss, also doing exactly what the standard model predicts.

    Powering up

    “This is probably the final word,” wrote CERN physicist Adam Falkowski on his blog.

    Ever the optimist, de Roeck thinks there’s still room in the data for the two photon decay channel to be caught misbehaving. Our present outlook is due to our relatively fuzzy view of the behaviour so far, he says. When the LHC is switched back on next year after an upgrade, it will be smashing protons together with double the previous energy.

    With that kind of power, the measurements will be more exact, and any small deviations from standard model predictions could emerge. “It is most likely the last word for run one of the LHC, but definitely not the last word,” de Roeck says. “I still believe ultimately we will find significant deviations or something unexpected in the Higgs sector. Then all hell will break loose.”

    See the full article here.

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  • richardmitnick 1:17 pm on September 3, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From Symmetry: “Watching ‘the clock’ at the LHC” 

    Symmetry

    September 03, 2014
    Sarah Charley

    As time ticks down to the restart of the Large Hadron Collider, scientists are making sure their detectors run like clockwork.

    clock
    Photo by Antonio Saba, CERN

    For the last two years, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been quietly slumbering while engineers and technicians prime it for the next run of data-taking in the summer of 2015.

    But this has been anything but a break for researchers from the LHC experiments.

    “Two years seems like a long time, but it goes by really fast,” says Michael Williams, a researcher on the LHCb experiment and assistant professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “I think now it’s becoming a reality that running is coming soon, and it’s exciting.”

    CERN LHCb New
    LHCb

    One of the biggest tasks the collaborations are confronting right now is calibrating all the individual components so that their timing is completely synchronized. This synchronization of the components—called “the clock”—allows physicists to reconstruct the flights of particles through the different parts of the detector to form a picture of the entire collision event.

    “The clock is the foundation on which everything stands. It’s the heartbeat of the detector,” says UCLA physicist and CMS run coordinator Greg Rakness. “If the clock isn’t working, then the data makes no sense.”

    CERN CMS New
    CMS

    The four largest LHC detectors—called ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb—each consist of dozens of smaller subdetectors, which in turn are supported by myriads of electronics and supporting subsystems. A huge challenge is ensuring that all of the subdetectors, electronics and supporting software are functioning as one single unit.

    CERN ALICE New
    ALICE

    CERN ATLAS New
    ATLAS

    “We have 18 different detectors that make up ALICE, and we have several different detection techniques,” says Federico Ronchetti, a scientist associated with CERN and Italian laboratory INFN who serves as the ALICE experiment 2015 run coordinator. “You have to combine the different pieces of information to produce an event. This is an integration, one of the most critical parts of the overall detector commissioning.”

    As Rakness says: “In the end, it’s one detector.”

    In addition to being in time with themselves, the LHC detectors must be in time with the LHC. During this next run, high-energy bunches of protons accelerated inside the LHC will collide every 25 nanoseconds. If a detector’s timing is out of sync with the accelerator, scientists will have no way of accurately reconstructing the particle collisions.

    If the detector were out of sync with the LHC, it would mistakenly show large chunks of energy suddenly going missing—just what physicists expect would happen if a rarely interacting particle, such as a dark matter particle, passed through the detector.

    “What a better way to create a fake ‘new physics’ signal than if half the detector is out of sync?” Rakness says. “You’d have new physics all the time!”

    Even though the task is daunting, the LHC researchers charged with commissioning the detectors are confident that they and their detectors will be ready for the accelerator’s second run in early 2015.

    “We understand our detector much better now,” says Kendall Reeves, a researcher for the University of Texas, Dallas, who works on the ATLAS experiment. “We have the experience from Run 1 to help out—and having that experience is invaluable. We are in a much better position now then we were at the beginning of Run 1.”

    “Nothing is too complicated,” Rakness says. “In the end, this whole complicated chain breaks down to a step-by-step process. And then it ticks.”

    CERN LHC particles

    LHC Tube Graphic
    LHC Tunnel

    CERN LHC Map
    LHC at CERN

    See the full article here.

    Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.


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  • richardmitnick 4:33 pm on August 25, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From Livermore Lab: “Calculating conditions at the birth of the universe” 


    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    08/25/2014
    Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov

    Using a calculation originally proposed seven years ago to be performed on a petaflop computer, Lawrence Livermore researchers computed conditions that simulate the birth of the universe.

    When the universe was less than one microsecond old and more than one trillion degrees, it transformed from a plasma of quarks and gluons into bound states of quarks – also known as protons and neutrons, the fundamental building blocks of ordinary matter that make up most of the visible universe.

    The theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) governs the interactions of the strong nuclear force and predicts it should happen when such conditions occur.

    In a paper appearing in the Aug. 18 edition of Physical Review Letters, Lawrence Livermore scientists Chris Schroeder, Ron Soltz and Pavlos Vranas calculated the properties of the QCD phase transition using LLNL’s Vulcan, a five-petaflop machine. This work was done within the LLNL-led HotQCD Collaboration, involving Los Alamos National Laboratory, Institute for Nuclear Theory, Columbia University, Central China Normal University, Brookhaven National Laboratory and Universität Bielefed in Germany.

    vulcan
    A five Petaflop IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer named Vulcan

    This is the first time that this calculation has been performed in a way that preserves a certain fundamental symmetry of the QCD, in which the right and left-handed quarks (scientists call this chirality) can be interchanged without altering the equations. These important symmetries are easy to describe, but they are computationally very challenging to implement.

    “But with the invention of petaflop computing, we were able to calculate the properties with a theory proposed years ago when petaflop-scale computers weren’t even around yet,” Soltz said.

    The research has implications for our understanding of the evolution of the universe during the first microsecond after the Big Bang, when the universe expanded and cooled to a temperature below 10 trillion degrees.

    Below this temperature, quarks and gluons are confined, existing only in hadronic bound states such as the familiar proton and neutron. Above this temperature, these bound states cease to exist and quarks and gluons instead form plasma, which is strongly coupled near the transition and coupled more and more weakly as the temperature increases.

    “The result provides an important validation of our understanding of the strong interaction at high temperatures, and aids us in our interpretation of data collected at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.” Soltz said.

    Brookhaven RHIC
    RHIC at Brookhaven

    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel
    LHC at CERN

    Soltz and Pavlos Vranas, along with former colleague Thomas Luu, wrote an essay predicting that if there were powerful enough computers, the QCD phase transition could be calculated. The essay was published in Computing in Science & Engineering in 2007, “back when a petaflop really did seem like a lot of computing,” Soltz said. “With the invention of petaflop computers, the calculation took us several months to complete, but the 2007 estimate turned out to be pretty close.”

    The extremely computationally intensive calculation was made possible through a Grand Challenge allocation of time on the Vulcan Blue Gene/Q Supercomputer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    See the full article here.

    Operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security
    Administration
    DOE Seal
    NNSA
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  • richardmitnick 11:28 am on August 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    Brian Cox on the LHC 

    Published on Dec 8, 2012

    A great video, a bit dated, by our freind Brian Cox

    “Rock-star physicist” Brian Cox talks about his work on the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Discussing the biggest of big science in an engaging and accessible way, Cox brings us along on a tour of the massive project.

    Watch, enjoy and learn.

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  • richardmitnick 10:20 am on August 12, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From Fermilab: “From the Deputy Director – CMS excitement” 


    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014
    jl
    Joe Lykken

    When I joined the CMS collaboration seven years ago, I was motivated both by the exciting discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider and by the fact that many of my friends from the Tevatron experiments were starting to move into leading roles for CMS. In the years leading up to the July 4, 2012, announcement of the Higgs boson discovery, I witnessed from the inside how the momentum carried over from the Tevatron era enabled, on many levels, the remarkable success of the CMS experiment.

    Fermilab Tevatron
    Tevatron rings

    CERN CMS New
    CMS at CERN’s LHC

    Fermilab DZero
    DZero at the Tevatron

    Fermilab CDF
    CDF at the Tevatron

    But wait — there’s more. The LHC will be turning on again early next year with both higher collision energy and higher “luminosity” — the rate at which collisions occur. This raises the prospects for many kinds of discoveries, including new heavy particles (perhaps the “superpartners” predicted by my favorite theory, supersymmetry), or unexpected properties of the Higgs boson. I have placed a friendly bet with Tom LeCompte, the former ATLAS collaboration physics coordinator and our Argonne neighbor, that superpartners will in fact be discovered by CMS and ATLAS during this next LHC run.

    CERN LHC Map
    LHC at CERN

    CERN ATLAS New
    ATLAS at CERN

    Supersymmetry standard model
    Standard Model of Supersymmetry

    Continued success of the CMS experiment requires significant upgrades to the CMS detector to meet the challenges of higher-luminosity running. The U.S. CMS collaboration has taken responsibility for upgrading three major subsystems in a Phase I upgrade project jointly funded by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

    Last week, this U.S. CMS project passed the simultaneous CD-2/CD-3 reviews, allowing these crucial upgrades to proceed. It was all smiles at the closeout last Thursday. This achievement reflects excellent work by the CMS Detector Upgrade Project team led by Steve Nahn, with deputies Aaron Dominguez and Lucas Taylor, involving CMS collaborators from many universities and labs and lots of talented people at Fermilab.

    A proud day for U.S. CMS, with many more to come.

    See the full article here.

    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.

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  • richardmitnick 10:47 am on July 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , CERN LHC, , , , vLHC@home   

    vLHC@home Banner

    vLHC Logo

    vLHC@home project

    This is a project that utilizes the CERN-developed CernVM virtual machine and the BOINC virtualization layer to harness volunteer cloud computing power for full-fledged LHC event physics simulation on volunteer computers.

    The theory simulations that have been running as Test4Theory since 2011, were the first of a series of physics applications running on the LHC@home platform. Soon the theory simulations will be followed by more simulations from the LHC experiment collaborations. These applications exploit virtual machine technology, enabling volunteers to contribute to the huge computational task of searching for new fundamental particles and physics at CERN’s LHC.

    The Virtual LHC@home project (formerly known as Test4Theory) allows users to participate in running simulations of high-energy particle physics using their home computers.

    The results are submitted to a database which is used as a common resource by both experimental and theoretical scientists working on the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.

    Lots of volunteers around the world are connected to this project running vLHCathome simulations right now.

    Hopefully, these explanations can help give an idea of why the computing resources made available by volunteers in this way can be crucial for improving our understanding of what is really happening inside the beam pipe of the Large Hadron Collider. Soon, other types of simulations from the LHC experiments will be added to this project.

    If you would like to participate in this project, downlod and install the BOINC and CERN VM software. Then attach to the project. While you are at BOINC, look over the other projects to find some that might be of interest.

    BOINC

    CERN LHC Map
    LHC map

    CERN LHC particles


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