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  • richardmitnick 11:14 am on July 28, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CERN HL-LHC, , , ,   

    From CERN: “Next-generation magnets: Small, but powerful” 

    CERN New Masthead
    CERN

    27 Aug 2012
    Cian O’Luanaigh

    The size of the magnets on a particle accelerator is crucial: it determines the final circumference and power. This spring, Fermilab unveiled a 10.4 Tesla magnet that is shorter than the 8 Tesla magnets currently installed in the LHC.

    men
    Members of the CERN-Fermilab team wind the magnet coil (Image: CERN)

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) represents the future of CERN’s flagship accelerator. From around 2020, this major upgrade to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will allow a substantial increase in the rate of collisions compared to today. The project poses various technical challenges, some of which appear to be close to being resolved.

    The success of the HL-LHC hinges on two essential conditions: the installation of more powerful magnets to guide the beams, and the addition of extra collimators – devices that narrow particle beams – to mitigate the increase in radiation. To add collimators to the LHC’s 27-kilometre ring – already full to bursting point – the current magnets need to be replaced with shorter but more powerful magnets. Fermilab’s engineers have been working on the project in collaboration with CERN. “The idea originated from a proposal made by Lucio Rossi, the head of CERN’s Magnets, Superconductors and Cryostats group, in 2010,” says Giorgio Apollinari, head of Fermilab’s Technical Division. “He suggested replacing a few of the LHC’s 8 Tesla dipole magnets with shorter 11 Tesla magnets. His idea aligned well with the goals of Fermilab’s R&D programme for projects including the muon collider, so we decided to collaborate.”

    It was not long before the decision started to pay off. In spring 2012, only 20 months after the research had begun, Fermilab unveiled a 10.4 Tesla, 2-metre prototype magnet. An 11-metre magnet should see the light of day after several more development phases; that’s 3 metres shorter than the existing LHC magnets. “We achieved this using niobium-tin (Nb3Sn) instead of niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti), which was the material used in the manufacture of the superconducting cables of the LHC magnets in the 1990s,” says Apollinari.

    Looking at what the CERN-Fermilab collaboration has achieved in less than two years, it may be safe to assume that 11 Tesla magnets are not far off…

    See the full article here.

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New
    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New

    LHC

    CERN LHC New

    LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries


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  • richardmitnick 1:29 pm on January 28, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , CERN HL-LHC, , , ,   

    From CERN: “Superconductivity leads the way to high luminosity” 

    CERN New Masthead

    28 Jan 2013
    Christine Sutton

    As the LHC nears the end of its first long run – from March 2010 to March 2013 – work towards the proposed first major upgrade is gathering speed. Around 2020, the LHC could extend its potential for discovery through a fivefold increase in luminosity beyond the design value, in a new configuration called the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC).

    hl
    New superconducting links developed to carry currents of up to 20,000 amperes are being tested at CERN (Image: CERN)

    A longer version of this article first appeared on the CERN Courier website.

    The HL-LHC will require a number of new high-field superconducting magnets and compact, ultra-precise superconducting radiofrequency cavities to manipulate the beams near to where they collide, as well as new 300-metre long high-power superconducting links. Superconductivity, which allows electric current to flow without losing energy, is the core technology for the LHC. The collider employs some 1700 large superconducting magnets and nearly 8000 superconducting corrector magnets, all of which are cooled by more than 100 tonnes of superfluid helium.

    The past year has seen some major developments in superconducting technologies for the HL-LHC. The plans include magnets based on niobium-tin superconductor, which can reach higher magnetic fields than the existing structures based on niobium-titanium. Such magnets have already been successfully tested in the US.
    test
    Members of the CERN-Fermilab team wind magnets for the High Luminosity LHC (Image: CERN/Fermilab)

    Prototypes for different designs of special radiofrequency cavities to rotate bunches of particles before they collide are being tested in the UK and US as well as at CERN. To relocate equipment away from the LHC tunnel, new superconducting links developed to carry currents of up to 20,000 amperes are being tested at CERN.

    The HL-LHC project, which could be approved by CERN Council in June in the context of the updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, would yield up to ten times as many collisions per year as occurred in 2012.

    See the current article here.

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New

    LHC

    CERN LHC New

    LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries


    ScienceSprings is powered by MAINGEAR computers

     
  • richardmitnick 11:29 am on August 28, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , CERN HL-LHC, , , , ,   

    From CERN Bulletin via Fermilab Today: “Small but powerful” 

    The first notice I had of this article was in today’s Fermilab Today. It has as of yet not shown up in Cern Bulletin RSS feeds, although it is listed on the main Cern Bulletin page.

    27 August 2012
    Anaïs Schaeffer

    “Magnet size is crucial to an accelerator as it determines the final circumference and power. This spring, Fermilab unveiled a 10.4 Tesla magnet that is shorter than the 8 Tesla magnets currently installed in the LHC. These new magnets will be a valuable asset to the HL-LHC, the next step of the LHC machine.

    The HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) represents the future of CERN’s flagship accelerator. From around 2020, this major upgrade will allow a substantial increase in the rate of collisions compared to today. The project poses various technical challenges, some of which appear to be close to being resolved.

    mag
    An 11 T magnet ready for cryogenic testing. No image credit

    The success of the HL-LHC hinges on two essential conditions: the installation of more powerful magnets to guide the beams, and the addition of extra collimators to mitigate the increase in radiation. However, one of the key questions is how to insert additional collimators in a 27 km ring already full to bursting. The answer is to replace the current magnets by shorter but more powerful magnets, which is what Fermilab’s engineers have been working on in collaboration with CERN. ‘The idea originated from a proposal made by Lucio Rossi, the head of CERN’s Magnets, Superconductors and Cryostats group, in 2010,’ explains Giorgio Apollinari, head of Fermilab’s Technical Division. ‘During a discussion he suggested replacing a few of the LHC’s 8 Tesla dipole magnets with shorter 11 Tesla magnets. His idea aligned well with the goals of Fermilab’s R&D programme for projects including the muon collider, so we decided to collaborate.”

    See the full article at CERN Bulletin here.

    See the article in Fermilab Today here.

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    ATLAS

    i2

    ALICE

    CMS

    i3

    LHCb
    i4

    LHC

    Quantum Diaries


    ScienceSprings is powered by MAINGEAR computers

     
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